Welcome to Building on Success.


Building on Success: Kia Eke Panuku and Te Kākahu

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/building-on-success-kia-eke-panuku-and-te-kakahu/

Building on Success works with school leaders and teachers on increasing educational success for Māori in English-medium secondary schools. It does so by building capability in professional leadership, schooling practices, and curriculum design.

Building on Success is comprised of two professional learning models delivered by two groups:

Kia Eke Panuku is a consortium that is led by Waikato University, and includes Auckland University and Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Te Kākahu is a locally developed professional learning model in the Whanganui rohe. It is led by Te Puna o Whanganui and Cognition Education

Categories

Part of
Crown leadership

Kia Eke Panuku

Kia Eke Panuku: Building on Success is a professional learning and development school-reform initiative currently operating in 94 secondary schools from Kaitaia to Invercargill. 

Contributions and resources

Kaupapa

The kaupapa of Kia Eke Panuku is:

Secondary schools giving life to Ka Hikitia and addressing the aspirations of Māori communities by supporting Māori students to pursue their potential.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku
Kaupapa
Working together
Kia Eke Panuku whakapapa

Kia Eke Panuku: Building on Success is a professional learning and development (PLD) initiative led by The University of Waikato, and including Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi and The University of Auckland. 

The personnel involved in the project have considerable academic and theoretical knowledge. Using their expertise and experience, this group brought together key findings from previous PLD initiatives in order to develop the Kia Eke Panuku model.  The earlier PLD initiatives that informed this project are:

  • Te Kotahitanga
  • He Kākano
  • The Starpath Project for Tertiary Participation and Success
  • The Secondary Literacy Project
  • The Numeracy Project. 

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Working together
Action plan

Effective sustainable change requires a robust plan.  Kia Eke Panuku kaitoro (facilitators) work with schools to develop an action plan focusing on the following aspects:

  1. Strategic change leadership teams

    Kaitoro (facilitators), school leaders, and teachers collaboratively build their capacity and capability in culturally responsive and relational practices.

  2. Dimensions of change

    The strategic change leadership team is supported by kaitoro to develop and implement a potential-focused action plan across five interdependent dimensions that feed into closing the gaps. These dimensions are levers for change for accelerated school reform:

  3. Evidence

    Understanding and critical analysis of evidence is used to build a rich profile of the school context and the impact on outcomes for Māori learners.

  4. Smart tools

    Kaitoro make available and provide support with a variety of tools and processes so that school teams can activate their action plans and meet their goals.

Action plan
Resources

The Kia Eke Panuku website lists many of the resources developed to support schools participating in Kia Eke Panuku. It features a range of charts, diagrams, images, information sheets, and brochures, including four of the Te Kotahitanga eBooks. The resources can be downloaded or viewed online.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Resources

Resources and downloads

Kia Eke Panuku: Building on Success

Kia Eke Panuku: Building on Success is a professional development school-reform initiative currently operating in 94 secondary schools from Kaitaia to Invercargill.

Mahi Tahi - The Kia Eke Panuku Team

This is one of a set of documents, written by the Kia Eke Panuku Team Academic Directors and Kaitoro, reflecting their understanding and experience of the Kia Eke Panuku institutions. The documents are listed in the order they appear on the Mahi Tahi framework.

Dimensions: Leadership

This brochure discusses leadership, one of the five interdependent dimensions of change that schools in Kia Eke Panuku apply to close the gap between Māori and non-Māori achievement. It explains that transformative leadership across the school and the school system will help effect the social change that is needed to ensure that students can achieve educational success as Māori.

Dimensions: Culturally Responsive and Relational Pedagogy

This brochure discusses culturally responsive and relational pedagogy. In Kia Eke Panuku, school leaders and teachers create contexts for meaningful learning where Māori learners are able to connect new learning with their prior knowledge and cultural experiences and use evidence of this to inform their learning.

Dimensions: Educationally Powerful Connections with Māori

Learning connections with whānau, hapū and iwi support cultural continuity and educational achievement. This brochure discusses what is involved in creating educationally powerful connections with Māori. These are learning connections between schools, whānau, hapū and iwi that support cultural continuity and educational achievement.

Dimensions: Literacy, te reo Māori and numeracy

This brochure discusses the dimension of literacy, te reo Māori, and numeracy. It explains that proficiency in these skills allows students to achieve across the curriculum and enables them to express their language, culture and identity. This empowers them to access a wide range of career and employment opportunities and enjoy and achieve educational success as Māori.

Dimensions: Closing the Gaps

This brochure explains that closing the gaps within Kia Eke Panuku is a process of building on what we know works for Māori and using evidence to identify next learning steps. It requires the school and school system to take ownership and implement all the dimensions coherently across the school and the school system. Through learning, unlearning, and relearning, leaders and teachers can support Māori students to achieve and enjoy educational success as Māori.

Framework (image)
Mahi Tahi framework
Mahi Tahi framework

This one-page chart shows the institutions created through participation in Kia Eke Panuku. It also shows the simultaneous success trajectories for Māori achieving success as Māori, as intended through Ka Hikitia, and for achieving the Better Public Service goals.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Framework
Making the Difference

Mahi Tahi engenders collaborating with collective responsibility, accountability and commitment to support and care for each other throughout all endeavours. The Kia Eke Panuku website identifies seven defining elements of mahi tahi. It theorises the synergy of their coming together for transformative school reform within Kia Eke Panuku.

  1. Kaupapa Māori and critical theories

  2. Disrupting the pedagogical status quo

  3. Mahi Tahi

  4. The dimensions

  5. Spiraling critical cycle of self-reflection

  6. The ako: critical contexts for learning

  7. Conclusion

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Making the Difference
How it started
What is Success as Māori

The Ka Hikitia vision: Māori enjoying and achieving education success as Māori

The Kia Eke Panuku Expert Advisory Group developed a discussion chart to exemplify what is meant by the Ka Hikitia vision, “enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori”. The aim was not to provide a definitive answer on what “success as Māori” means but to provide a starting point for thoughtful discussions.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

How it started
Ngā Huatau Taiohi

Huatau Taiohi engage with the vision" enjoying and acheiving success as Māori.

Using the chart developed by the Kia Eke Panuku Expert Advisory Group, students from 58 Kia Eke Panuku schools disussed what the Ka Hikitia vision meant to them.  This took place over nine Hui Whakaako held from Whitiora Marae in the Far North to Te Rau Aroha Marae at the Bluff.  Many common themes became apparent and the voices of Māori students who shared their perspectives were collated according to these themes into a collection called Ngā Huatau Taiohi.

The resources below summarize some of the key outcomes from Hui Whakaako at the nine marae.  The Kia Eke Panuku website provides an interactive exploration of the rich insights that can be found in Ngā Huatau Taiohi .  

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Ngā Huatau Taiohi

Resources and downloads

Huria Marae

Students at Hūria Marae in Tauranga share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Whitiora Marae, Te Tii

Students at Whitiora Marae in the Far North share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Pūkaki Marae

Students at Pūkaki Marae in Mangere share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Nukuhau Marae

Students at Nukuhau Marae in Taupō share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Ōākura Marae

Students at Ōākura Marae in Taranaki share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Waiwhetu Marae

Students at Waiwhetu Marae in Lower Hutt share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Omaka Marae

Students at Omaka Marae in Marlborough share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Tuahiwi Marae

Students at Tuahiwi Marae in North Canterbury share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Te Rau Aroha Marae

Students at Te Rau Aroha Marae in Bluff share their perspectives on what “enjoying and achieving education success as Māori” means to them.

Tools
Kia Eke Panuku facilitator tools

Facilitators in Kia Eke Panuku use a number of tools to help schools achieve the Ka Hikitia vision of Māori enjoying educational success as Māori.

Some of these tools are listed here and can be found in the resources below.

  1.  Intensity Tool chart (PDF)

  2. Classroom Observation Tool (PDF)

  3. Classroom Observation Tool Conventions (PDF)

  4. Mahi Tahi Data Collation Tool (Word)

  5. Critical Conversation Continuum (Word)

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Tools

Resources and downloads

Intensity tool

The Intensity Tool is an A3 chart developed by the Kia Eke Panuku PLD programme to determine the model of individualised professional development appropriate for each participating school. 

Classroom observation tool

The Kia Eke Panuku PLD programme created this observation tool to support the development of culturally responsive and relational pedagogy.

Classroom observation tool convention

The Kia Eke Panuku PLD programme created this document to support application of its classroom observation tool.

Mahi Tahi data collation tool

The Kia Eke Panuku PLD programme developed this tool for schools to track their progress in activating the Critical Cycle of Learning as they engage in Mahi Tahi.

Critical conversation continuum

The Kia Eke Panuku PLD programme developed this tool for schools to track their progress across the Kia Eke Panuku Dimensions. They do so in relation to GPILSEO, a model for sustaining reform.

Day of the long hard look (video)
Description

In this clip, members of the strategic change leadership team (SCLT) discuss how a significant drop in the NCEA achievement outcomes of their Māori students, which had been consistently tracking upwards since 2009, created a context that required a critically reflective analysis of both cohort and individual data, alongside a review of the current tracking and monitoring processes and tools.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Day of the long hard look
Tracking for success (video)
Description

In this video, the deputy principal describes the process the school leaders went through to develop electronic systems and processes to track student academic success. The principal describes how the tracking tool alerted school leaders when students were at risk of not achieving and led them to consider ways to ensure students had further opportunities to succeed.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Tracking for success
Where are we now? (video)
Description

In this clip, members of the strategic change leadership team (SCLT) talk about the way in which the use of evidence facilitated learning around tracking and monitoring processes can lead to changed processes and practices focused on Māori student outcomes.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Where are we now?

Most effective when used together

Manutaki Māori (video)
Description

Manutaki Kim Rogers suggests that Māori students need more than a focus on intellectual or academic development. Making authentic connections for Māori students to their physical, cognitive, whānau and spiritual well-being, in ways that link the past, present and future sees Kim’s role as an important point of contact between the school, individual students and their whānau.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Manutaki Māori
Te Roopu Tautoko (video)
Description

This video describes the establishment of the Roopu Tautoko (support group) at Kerikeri High School and how the group operates. The Roopu Tautoko was set up to support Māori immersion students’ transition into English medium. It now has become a ‘shining part of our school’.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Te Roopu Tautoko
Kapa Haka - important to everyone (video)
Description

In this clip, members of the strategic change leadership team (SCLT) discuss how a significant drop in the NCEA achievement outcomes of their Māori students, which had been consistently tracking upwards since 2009, created a context that required a critically reflective analysis of both cohort and individual data, alongside a review of the current tracking and monitoring processes and tools.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Kapa Haka - important to everyone
Identity (video)
Description

In this clip, Māori educators and a Māori student draw from their own experiences to discuss the concept of identity and the central role schools play in the identity development of Māori students. 

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Identity
Te Roopu Tautoko (video)
Description

This video describes the establishment of the Roopu Tautoko (support group) at Kerikeri High School and how the group operates. The Roopu Tautoko was set up to support Māori immersion students’ transition into English medium. It now has become a ‘shining part of our school’.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Te Roopu Tautoko
Kapa haka - important to everyone (video)
Description

Kapa Haka is an initiative that schools often engage with as they strive for success as Māori. This video looks at the place of Kapa Haka in shaping identities of rangatahi Māori and Pākehā students located within the bi-cultural heart of Kerikeri High School.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Kapa haka - important to everyone
Māori Succeeding as Māori (video)
Description

In this clip a school principal talks about how he works with his school community to develop an environment where Māori learners are supported and can succeed as Māori. Māori parents talk about their own and their sons’ experiences at this school and a senior Māori student talks about how Māori feel safe, are acknowledged and set up for success.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Māori Succeeding as Māori
Deliberate acts of leadership (video)
Description

In this clip a school principal talks about how he works with his teachers and Māori community to develop a bicultural school context within which both Treaty partners are acknowledged and valued. A teacher and members of the Māori community describe how this principal’s leadership has facilitated a reciprocal relationship between the school and their local Māori community.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Deliberate acts of leadership
Rawiri Manley (video)
Rawiri Manley at Ka Hikitia Effectiveness Report launch

Rotorua Boys' High School’s Head Boy, Rawiri Manley, highlights the parallels between his own journey as a Māori student in the 21st century and his ancestors' journey to Aotearoa.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Rawiri Manley
Day of the long hard look (video)
Description

In this clip, members of the strategic change leadership team (SCLT) discuss how a significant drop in the NCEA achievement outcomes of their Māori students, which had been consistently tracking upwards since 2009, created a context that required a critically reflective analysis of both cohort and individual data, alongside a review of the current tracking and monitoring processes and tools.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Day of the long hard look
Tracking for Success (video)
Description

In this video, the deputy principal describes the process the school leaders went through to develop electronic systems and processes to track student academic success. The principal describes how the tracking tool alerted school leaders when students were at risk of not achieving and led them to consider ways to ensure students had further opportunities to succeed.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Tracking for Success
Where are we now? (video)
Description

In this clip, members of the strategic change leadership team (SCLT) talk about the way in which the use of evidence facilitated learning around tracking and monitoring processes can lead to changed processes and practices focussed on Māori student outcomes.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Where are we now?
An accelerated response (video)
An accelerated response informed by evidence

When teachers focus on a discrepancy between reading and writing levels as a deficiency, this can prevent them from recognising learner potential. In this clip members of the SCLT reflect on the support they have put in place for a group of junior students to improve the quality of their writing

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

An accelerated response
Dialogic professional learning (video)
Description

In this clip Strategic Change Leadership Team (SCLT) members discuss how they have changed the way that professional learning occurs in their school. Rather than taking a knowledge transmission approach to professional learning they now provide teachers with multiple opportunities to engage in dialogue and collectively make sense of culturally responsive and relational pedagogy.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Dialogic professional learning
Deliberate acts of teaching (video)
Description

In this clip the teacher shares how she has developed culturally responsive and relational practices to challenge and extend her Māori learners. 

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Deliberate acts of teaching
Realising academic potential (video)
Description

In this clip the teacher reflects on her own learning journey and the changes that she has made to improve outcomes for her Māori learners.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Realising academic potential
Tacit to explicit (video)
Tacit to explicit - learning about learning

In this clip the teacher works alongside students to explore the learning process and identify the steps they might take to produce a quality piece of persuasive writing.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Tacit to explicit

Most effective when used together

Community connections (video)
Description

This clip introduces the concept of think globally, act locally as an entry point into inquiry-based learning. A culturally responsive pedagogy of relations is utilised throughout the project to support Māori students to achieve at a high level in a school involved in the Kia Eke Panuku professional learning and development project.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Community connections
Culturally responsive contexts (video)
Culturally responsive contexts for learning

Students and their teachers share their experiences of learning through a cross curricular inquiry learning opportunity themed around ‘Think Global, Act Local’.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Culturally responsive contexts
Setting high expectations (video)
Description

Teachers and leaders describe how they set high expectations for Māori students who are engaged in learning opportunities that are relevant and engage them in focusing on the moral dilemmas that affect their environment and community.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Setting high expectations
A way of being (video)
Description

Teachers reflect on their own and students’ experiences of learning within a cross curricular inquiry project themed around ‘Think Global, Act Local’. In implementing the inquiry, teachers existing ideas about power relationships were challenged.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

A way of being
Changing thoughts and actions (video)
Description

Teachers reflect on their own and students’ experiences of learning within a cross curricular inquiry project themed around ‘Think Global, Act Local’. In implementing the inquiry, teachers existing ideas about effective culturally responsive and relational pedagogy were challenged.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Changing thoughts and actions
Collaborative learning (video)
Description

This clip describes how students work together and with teacher facilitation to support the development of each other’s learning. Teachers also reflect on how dialogue deepens relationships and how this impacts on learning.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Collaborative learning
Interdependent learning (video)
Description

This clip describes how students respond to a classroom environment that requires them to be interdependent learners. The students find this culturally responsive environment rewarding and find this approach impacts positively on their learning.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Interdependent learning
Planning for success (video)
Description

This clip shows how teachers and school leaders planned an inquiry based learning opportunity that activates students’ prior knowledge and interests as well as whānau and community involvement. Teachers explain how they developed an understanding of how to adapt their expertise in order to respond to the needs of students within a culturally responsive and relational pedagogy.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Planning for success
Reflect and evaluate (video)
Description

This video describes student-centred assessment processes which encourage the engagement, reflection and evaluation of their learning journey and the finished project. Students actively share their work with their peers, teachers and the school community.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Reflect and evaluate
Talking past each other (video)
Description

Rawiri, a Year 13 graduate from Rotorua Boys' High School, reflects on the challenges faced by Māori students who don’t see themselves as learners because of their negative experiences of education. He suggests that while these students often perceive teachers to be disciplinarians, in his experience, teachers have high expectations that students will engage and learn.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Talking past each other
Community (video)
Making Space for the Community

This video explores the relationship between whānau and the school. It highlights the new learning (unlearning/relearning) that leaders and teachers need to consider as they prioritise a focus on developing educationally powerful connections with whānau and the Māori community.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Community
Learning partnerships (video)
Description

Students benefit when they are both informed about and empowered to manage their own learning pathways; and when their whānau are engaged partners on that journey.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Learning partnerships
Whānau conferencing (video)
Description

This video clip shows the steps Flaxmere College have taken to build a culture within the school that has resulted in whānau conferencing being a positive, well attended and rewarding experience for whānau, students and staff.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Whānau conferencing
Manutaku Māori (video)
Description

Manutaki Kim Rogers suggests that Māori students need more than a focus on intellectual or academic development. Making authentic connections for Māori students to their physical, cognitive, whānau and spiritual well-being, in ways that link the past, present and future sees Kim’s role as an important point of contact between the school, individual students and their whānau.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Manutaku Māori
Learning pathways (video)
Description

Opening up horizons for their students, staff at William Colenso College go the extra miles to expose Year 10-13 students to a range of tertiary options. 

No captions or transcript available

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Learning pathways
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Te Kākahu

Te Kākahu aims to strengthen school and iwi capability to accelerate valued outcomes for Māori learners in secondary schools.

Contributions and resources

Who, what, where?

Te Kākahu is a professional learning and development response led by Te Puna Mātauranga o Whanganui and Cognition Education Ltd.

Over 2014–16, Te Kākahu is being run in up to ten schools, working directly with whānau, hapū, and iwi within the Whanganui rohe.

Who, what, where?
The outrigger

Building on Success is about what makes the waka go faster. It’s about looking forward, not back. Māori didn’t need support with waka made to travel close to shore, but when we sailed into the open ocean, our waka needed that extra outrigger to provide speed and stability.

Source: Dr Te Tiwha Puketapu, New Zealand Education Gazette (Feb 2015)
The outrigger
A partnership
The iwi–school relationship

Te Kākahu draws on iwi capability to shift pan-Māori perspectives within curriculum towards a place-based iwi-centric curriculum. It aims to normalise local tikanga and knowledge within classrooms and school culture. Knowledge sharing between iwi and schools is carefully orchestrated so that ways of knowing, doing, and being are accessed and valued, and not assimilated.

A partnership
Inquiry-based programme

Schools work with facilitators to design an inquiry-based programme of support, informed by the individual school and its student achievement and participation data.

Boards of trustees, leaders, and teachers are invited to focus their efforts on embedding the identity, language, and culture of their Māori students into school programmes and teaching practices and to focus on relationships-for-learning pedagogies that are known to impact on outcomes for Māori learners.

Inquiry-based programme
Facilitating collaboration

An iwi education forum, known as Te Paepae Mātauranga, is also collaborating by supporting engagement with schools in their respective rohe.

They have agreed to work alongside local schools, whānau, hapū, and iwi based on the following principles:

  1. Mana whenua

    Iwi protocols and responsibilities will guide PLD programme engagement with schools and whānau. This principle acknowledges iwi interests and expectations in describing, supporting, and evaluating success as iwi. 

  2. Kotahitanga

    Whanganui iwi and neighbouring iwi agree to work together to design curriculum offerings, support whānau engagement, and support schools with learning and teaching. This principle recognises the potential of collaborative initiatives to achieve educational goals and aspirations.

  3. Rau kotahi

    Rangatahi will have access to curriculum offerings from iwi groups involved with this PLD programme. This principle respects the whakapapa relationships of rangatahi with more than one iwi and how they choose to express their identity, language, and culture.      

  4. Whānau Ora

    Iwi will support whānau to understand and engage with schools so they may positively influence the learning process and educational achievement of rangatahi Māori. This principle reflects the pivotal role of whānau as a critical voice in the education of their rangatahi.

Facilitating collaboration
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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.