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Exploring connections with whānau

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/exploring-connections-with-whanau/

It is important that schools connect with whānau in ways that support them to add their voices to the work of meeting the educational strengths and needs of their tamariki and mokopuna. To do this, schools need to first examine their current interactions.

The tools in this kete have been created by people who work with schools to improve their relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi.

Ways of exploring school–whānau partnerships

The tools in this collection come from recent sources, such as the eBook Connecting with Māori Communities and ERO school-review frameworks and evaluation indicators.

Contributions and resources

ERO evaluation indicators (image)
ERO6Domains
Description

Educationally powerful connections and relationships is one of the six core domains that the ERO identifies as a significant influence on improving student outcomes.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators (2015)

ERO evaluation indicators
Engage and involve
ERO Evaluation Indicators for educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 1 : Learning-centred relationships effectively engage and involve the school community. 

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Parents, families, whānau, and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning.

  2. A strengths-based approach recognises and affirms the diverse identities, languages, and cultures of parents, families, whānau, and the community and proactively brokers engagement and participation.

  3. Parents, families, whānau, and the community participate in school activities and decision making in a variety of productive roles.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Engage and involve
Reciprocal learning relationships
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 2: Communication supports and strengthens reciprocal, learning-centred relationships.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. A range of appropriate and effective communication strategies are used to communicate with and engage parents, families, whānau, and community.

  2. Students, parents and families, whānau, and teachers have shared understandings about curriculum goals and the processes of teaching and learning, and engage in productive learning conversations.

  3. Students, parents, families, whānau, and teachers work together to identify student strengths and learning needs, set goals, and plan responsive learning strategies and activities.

  4. Students, parents, families, whānau, and teachers understand the full range of pathways, programmes, options, and supports that are available and participate in informed decision making at critical transition points.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Reciprocal learning relationships
Learning at home
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 3: Student learning at home is actively promoted through the provision of relevant learning opportunities, resources, and support.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Parents, families, and whānau receive information and participate in individual and group learning opportunities that enable them to support and promote their children's learning.

  2. Any homework that is assigned is carefully designed to promote purposeful interactions between parents and children, and teachers provide timely, descriptive oral or written feedback.

  3. Parents, families, and whānau are enabled to support their children's learning through the provision of materials and the creation of connections with community resources.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Learning at home
Community collaboration
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 4: Community collaboration and partnerships extend and enrich opportunities for students to become confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Teachers and parents, family, whānau, and community engage in joint activities and interventions to improve learning and/or behaviour.

  2. The school and the community work together to support students in making effective transitions at critical points in their education pathway.

  3. The school proactively identifies and draws on community resources and expertise to improve learning opportunities and capacity to improve student achievement and well-being.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Community collaboration

Resources and downloads

ERO School Evaluation Indicators 2015

This is the complete School Evaluation Indicators 2015 pdf document. New effective practice indicators have been developed by working with expert advisers and drawing on the best evidence of what really works to achieve equity and excellence.

ERO School Evaluation Indicators – Outcome indicators

This pdf document summarises the evalutation indicators and effective practices across the six domains identified by the ERO as effective in raising student achievement.

ERO Framework for School Reviews – Self-review

The Framework for School Reviews is about the process the Education Review Office (ERO) uses when reviewing state primary and secondary schools. It includes strategies to assist the self-review process.

Partnership framework (image)
eBookFrameworkforCollaboration
A framework for partnerships and collaboration

Berryman and Ford express the view that “collaboration ideally entails shared expertise between educationalists and family caregivers”. That expertise requires shared understandings about the goals and the processes of teaching and learning.

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi by Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014), page 14

Partnership framework
IBRLA
IBRLA Framework

The IBRLA framework, proposed in 1999 by Bishop and Glynn, relates to power relationships in education.  In the 2014 Te Kotahitanga eBook Connecting with Māori Communities, Berryman and Ford suggest that schools adapt and apply this framework to discuss, plan, and evaluate how they engage whānau and the community.

The IBLA relationship framework tool, along with explanations, focus questions, and videos, can be viewed and downloaded in Chapter 7 of the Connecting with Māori Communities eBook hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website.

The IBRLA relationship framework is focused on five principles:

  1. initiation

  2. benefits

  3. representation

  4. legitimation

  5. accountability

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi by Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)

IBRLA
Whakataukī
Whakataukī: Nā tō rourou, nā taku rourou
ka ora ai te iwi

Literally: With your food basket and my food basket, the people will thrive.

Metaphorically: This whakataukī encapsulates the notion that while working in isolation might result in survival, working together can take people beyond survival and on to prosperity.

Similarly, when schools and their Māori communities (whānau, hapū, iwi) combine the skills and knowledge within in both settings, there is greater potential to accelerate the learning of Māori students. They can enjoy and achieve educational success as Māori.

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi by Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)

Whakataukī

Resources and downloads

Connecting with Māori communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook is hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website. It explores important ideas about creating powerful educational relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. It examines messages from research and provides strategies, tools, resources and videos to help put the ideas into practice.

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