Welcome to Building on Success.


Iwi aspirations for tamariki and mokopuna

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/iwi-aspirations-for-tamariki-and-mokopuna/

The term “mana whenua” provides a starting point for understanding the foundations of educational partnerships with iwi and hapū. Documents in this kete provide information and support for developing this understanding.

Understanding iwi aspirations for tamariki and mokopuna

This gallery is a response to the finding in Ka Hikitia: A Demonstration Report that indigenous educational expertise should drive culturally responsive provision for Māori learners. Partnerships with mana whenua are therefore an important layer of influence, especially in relation to how relationships can be bridged in ways that allow for shared goals, actions, and responsibilities.

The report is an output of the Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) programme.

Partnerships with mana whenua are therefore an important layer of influence, especially in relation to how relationships can be bridged in ways that allow for shared goals, actions, and responsibilities.

Contributions and resources

What will the future hold?

In Sir Mason Durie’s presentation to the PPTA Conference in 2006, this distinguished educator described a “distinctive New Zealand pedagogy [in which] Māori models and frameworks find a stronger place in both theory and practice”.

These key points and focus questions might guide you in your reading of this article:

  1. Durie refers to attitudinal changes, multiple pathways, inspirational teachers, and wise leaders as some of the conditions required to build a better educational future for all New Zealanders. What does the school sector need to undertake and do to grow their knowledge and to bring about these conditions for the future?

  2. The article provides some examples of initiatives that have led to progress for Māori within education. What initiatives are happening in your workplace that will build on these for the future of Māori and other New Zealanders?

  3. In what ways can your school community contribute to identifying, supporting, and sustaining future Māori leaders?

Source: Educational Leaders – Māori Education 2026 by Mason Durie (2012)

What will the future hold?
Māori Future Makers (video)
Description

The Māori Future Makers website profiles 30 inspirational Māori. These exceptional role models share personal success stories about the study pathways they pursued to achieve success.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Māori Future Makers

Māori Future Makers
Shared understanding of success

Iwi and schools may have different understandings about what Māori achieving educational success as Māori looks like. Ideally, this would constitute an early discussion between iwi and schools, so that they can co-construct a common goal and determine how each might assist the other in supporting Māori students reach the ideal graduate profile.

 

 

Melanie R. Riwai-Couch ; Source: Puna Kōrero: Iwi and schools working together to support Māori student success (University of Canterbury, 2014)
Shared understanding of success

Resources and downloads

Māori education 2026

In Sir Mason Durie’s presentation to the PPTA Conference in 2006, this distinguished educator described a “distinctive New Zealand pedagogy [in which] Māori models and frameworks will find a stronger place in both theory and practice”.

Māori Future Makers

Thirty inspirational Māori role models from a wide variety of sectors use video and text to share their personal stories of success.

Growing and planning for the future

Well-known New Zealanders share their thinking about the purpose and value of education and training. Educators can use these to demonstrate the many pathways to success.

Puna Korero: Iwi and schools working together to support Māori student success (University of Canterbury, 2014)

In her 2014 thesis, Dr Melanie Riwai-Couch explored the hopes iwi have for their tamariki and mokopuna. Educators can draw lessons from her work.

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Connecting with Māori communities

The eBook Connecting with Māori Communities outlines key messages about how schools might reconnect with their Māori communities, including whānau, hapū, and iwi. This gallery explores some of these messages.

Contributions and resources

Understanding mana whenua

From one iwi to the next, the mana whenua are recognised as guardians of the land. From a Māori perspective, their worldly power and prestige as guardians and holders of the land must continue to be acknowledged and respected.

When this happens, the active participation and commitment of the mana whenua, or local people, to different groups occupying these lands can develop a reciprocal relationship of support and strength.

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014) ; Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi
Understanding mana whenua
Whakataukī

Whakataukī: Nā tō rourou, nā taku rourou
ka ora ai te iwi

Literally: With your food basket and my food basket, the people will thrive

Metaphorically: This whakataukī encapsulates the notion that while working in isolation might result in survival, working together can take people beyond survival and on to prosperity.

Similarly, when schools and their Māori communities (whānau, hapū, iwi) combine the skills and knowledge that are located in both settings, there is greater potential to accelerate the learning of Māori students so that they can enjoy and achieve educational success as Māori.

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, Hapū, and Iwi

Whakataukī
Sharing the knowledge (video)
Description

"We thought we would take our staff to the marae so that they could learn about where the boys come from."

– Fred Whata, Deputy Principal, Rotorua Boys’ High School

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view this video with key thoughts, focus questions, and resources.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, Hapū, and Iwi

Sharing the knowledge
Modifying the cultural mainstream

In Partnerships with Indigenous Communities: Modifying the Cultural Mainstream (Glynn, Berryman, Walker, Reweti, and O’Brien, 2001) the pōwhiri provides a powerful analogy of the process of inclusion based on respect for differences. The pōwhiri provides us with four guidelines for establishing relationships with indigenous people that are based on mutual respect and trust.

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, Hapū and Iwi

Modifying the cultural mainstream
Building bridges

This thesis provides a helpful example of one secondary school’s efforts to engage with their Māori community. It is discussed in the eBook Connecting with Māori Communities.

Source: Building Bridges: Seeking collaboration with a Māori community by Deborah Jane Hohneck (University of Waikato, 2013)

Building bridges

Resources and downloads

Connecting with Māori communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook is hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website. It explores important ideas about creating powerful educational relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. It examines messages from research and provides strategies, tools, resources and videos to help put the ideas into practice.

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The iwi landscape

This gallery considers the importance of “where you belong” as a pivotal concept for Māori and many other indigenous peoples. It is often the first question or statement made by way of introduction.

Contributions and resources

Te Kāhui Māngai (image)
Iwi area map
Description

Te Kāhui Māngai (Directory of Iwi and Māori Organisations) is a map of Aotearoa providing information on iwi identified in the Māori Fisheries Act 2004 and on iwi or hapū that have begun the process of negotiating settlement of their historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. The information includes their rohe, hapū, marae, and the organisations whose mandates to represent these iwi or hapū have been recognised by the New Zealand Government.

Source: Te Puni Kōkiri

Te Kāhui Māngai
Explore Iwi (image)
Te Ara iwi
Description

Te Ara provides stories and histories of many iwi.

Source: Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Explore Iwi

Resources and downloads

Te Kāhui Māngai (Directory of iwi and Māori organisations)

This part of Te Puni Kōkiri’s website shows a map of New Zealand that gives information on iwi identified in the Māori Fisheries Act 2004 and those iwi and hapū that have begun the process of negotiating settlement of their historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. The information includes their rohe, hapū and marae.

Te Ara The Encyclopedia of New Zealand – Explore iwi

On this page, there is a map and associated information that can provide schools with a central place from which to explore iwi locations and background information. It is available in English and te reo Māori.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.