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Professional learning and development – the school journey

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/professional-learning-and-development-pld-the-school-journey/

This kete looks at how schools have been supported by professional learning and development (PLD) responses. Over time, these have had an increasing focus on accelerating outcomes for Māori learners.

The listed PLD responses continue to be significant sources of information, resources, and insights of value today. They also illustrate how successfully they have added to our knowledge of what works and why, and for whom.

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Exploring Professional Learning and Development (PLD) responses

This gallery offers a summary of some of the significant PLD responses that were implemented over time. 

Contributions and resources

Te Kauhua

The Ministry of Education’s Te Kauhua response began in 2001 and ran over seven years.

Te Kauhua (meaning the supports on a waka and used as a metaphor for supporting each other on the same journey) was an exploratory professional learning and development pilot. It provided schools with the opportunity, in partnership with their Māori community, of exploring approaches that enabled teachers to improve outcomes for Māori students and work more effectively with Māori whānau.

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kauhua

Te Kauhua
Te Kotahitanga

Te Kotahitanga was implemented in five phases from 2001–2012.

The overall aim of the Te Kotahitanga response was to investigate how to improve the educational achievement of Māori students in mainstream secondary school classrooms.  It provided data and insights about what works for Māori, which informed the subsequent Building on Success PLD contracts.

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kotahitanga

Te Kotahitanga
Te Mana Kōrero

Te Mana Kōrero was a series of professional learning and development packages.

It drew on evidence, from programmes such as Te Kotahitanga and Te Kauhua, that showed what was working for Māori students. Each of these successful PLD programmes was based on important Māori concepts or principles:

  • ako – effective and reciprocal teaching and learning relationships where everyone is a learner and a teacher
  • manaakitanga – the care for students as culturally located people above all else
  • mana motuhake – the care by teachers for the academic success and performance of their students
  • whakawhanaungatanga – the nurturing of mutually respectful and collaborative relationships between all parties around student learning.

Source: Ministry of Education –Te Mana Kōrero

Te Mana Kōrero
Starpath Project

Hapaitia te ara tika pumau ai te rangatiratanga mo nga uri whakatipu – foster the pathway of knowledge to strength, independence, and growth for future generations.

This response was a pioneering research project that focused on transforming educational outcomes for New Zealand students who were underachieving at secondary school and hence were under-represented in tertiary education.

Starpath was a Partnership for Excellence led by the University of Auckland in partnership with the New Zealand Government. It aimed to address New Zealand’s comparatively high rate of educational inequality, with Māori and Pasifika students and students from low socio-economic backgrounds showing significant rates of educational underachievement compared with their peers.

Source: University of Auckland – Starpath

Starpath Project
Ako Panuku

This Ministry-commissioned response recognised that Maori-medium kura wanted to grow their knowledge of effective practices for their rangatahi.

Ako Panuku provided Māori secondary/kura teachers with professional learning that exemplified best teaching practice, and promoted career development, while creating the opportunity to be involved in a community of practice.

Source: Ministry of Education – Ako Panuku

Ako Panuku

Resources and downloads

Te Kauhua

The Ministry of Education’s Te Kauhua response began in 2001 and ran over seven years.
Te Kauhua was an exploratory professional learning and development pilot. It provided schools with the opportunity, in partnership with their Māori community, to explore professional development approaches that enabled teachers to improve outcomes for Māori students and work more effectively with Māori whānau.

Te Kotahitanga

Te Kotahitanga was implemented in five phases from 2001–2012.
The overall aim of the Te Kotahitanga response was to investigate how to improve the educational achievement of Māori students in mainstream secondary school classrooms. It provided data and insights about what works for Māori, which informed the subsequent Building on Success PLD contracts.

Te Mana Kōrero

Te Mana Kōrero was a series of professional learning and development packages.
It drew on the evidence that showed what was working for Māori students, from programmes such as Te Kotahitanga and Te Kauhua.

Starpath Project

This response was a pioneering research project that focused on transforming educational outcomes for New Zealand students who were underachieving at secondary school and hence were under-represented in tertiary education.

Ako Panuku

Ako Panuku provided Māori secondary/kura teachers with professional learning that exemplified best teaching practice, and promoted career development, while creating involvement in a community of practice.
Ako Panuku web presence was developed to support and build on the expertise and professionalism of Māori teachers, and contains many Māori themed resources for English medium schools.

Tu Rangātira

This initiative to support and strengthen leadership of teaching was developed through open consultation between the Ministry and the Māori-medium education sector. They had stated their commitment to working with whānau to deliver an education system that focused on raising the achievement of Māori learners.

Tu Rangātira brought together shared ideas, experiences, and leadership practices from the Māori medium-education sector. It responded to the fact that leaders of kura also wanted support, and it drew on kaupapa Māori values and models of leadership to ensure high-quality outcomes for their students.

Source: Educational Leaders

Tu Rangātira
He Kākano

In order to scale up the impact of effective practices, school leaders across English-medium secondary and area schools were offered this response – He Kākano, a national school-based professional learning and development programme.  It focused on culturally responsive ways to improve leadership practices and so ensure that Māori learners achieve educational success as Māori.

Source: MInistry of Education – He Kākano

He Kākano
Tātaiako

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

The New Zealand Teachers Council developed Tātaiako to help early childhood, primary, and secondary educators to work more effectively with Māori learners and their whānau.

The resource was informed by Ka Hikitia and Te Kotahitanga findings, and it highlights the importance of teacher–learner relationships, whānau, language, culture, and identity. It sets out cultural competencies with associated behavioural indicators. It also contains examples of student voice and whānau voice. Each of the competencies is linked to one (or more) of the Graduating Teacher Standards; and links are also made to the Registered Teacher Criteria.

Source: Education Council

Tātaiako
Rangiātea

Rangiātea: Bringing practices to life

Resources that show what effective practices look like are valued in our system. Alongside Ruia and He Kākano, the Ministry commissioned the Rangiātea collection of case studies highlighting the experiences of five secondary schools working towards realising Māori students’ potential.

Included in the case studies are the strategies used by school leaders – and the factors that contributed to the improved achievement of their Māori students. There are also exemplars of how particular programmes have been used successfully in each school.

Source: Educational Leaders

Rangiātea
Ruia

Self-review, essential to teaching as inquiry in the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, requires robust questioning. To support this, the Ministry commissioned the Ruia website and self-review tools.  These were designed to help principals and other school leaders to gather evidence of impact on Māori learners through appraisal processes.

A second tool helps analyse the relationships between schools and whānau with support to move these relationships into educative partnerships.

Designed as online tools with analysis capability, Ruia tools help schools to more easily capture evidence for their decision making.

Source: Educational Leaders - Ruia

Ruia

Resources and downloads

Tu Rangātira: Māori Medium Educational Leadership

This initiative was developed through open consultation between the Ministry and the Māori-medium education sector. It brought together shared ideas, experiences, and leadership practices from the Māori-medium education sector. It responded to the fact that leaders of kura also wanted support, and it drew on kaupapa Māori values and models for leadership to ensure high-quality outcomes for their students.

He Kākano

This national, school-based professional development programme was offered to school leaders across English-medium secondary and area schools to scale up the impact of effective practices. It focused on culturally responsive ways to improve their practices so that Māori learners would enjoy educational success as Māori.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

This resource is about teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners and with their whānau and iwi. Designed for teachers, it will support your work to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners to ensure they enjoy educational success as Māori.

Rangiātea case studies

These Rangiātea case studies and exemplars examine five secondary schools. They look at the strategies used by school leadership teams and report on the key factors that are contributing towards lifting Māori student achievement in their schools.
The resources consist of downloadable PDF files with summaries and reflective questions that will support leadership teams in discussion and reflection.

Ruia – Reviewing your school–whānau partnerships

This interactive tool is part of the Ruia School–Whānau Partnership resource. It will help school leaders to examine their partnerships with whānau.

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Toolkit: Exploring tools to help educators

In this gallery, we look at a number of tools produced by the Ministry of Education for educators to review their systems and daily practices in order to shift towards the Māori potential approach.

Among other tools, this gallery includes ten eBooks that present the theory behind and practical examples of effective practice in teaching. These eBooks come from more than 13 years of iterative research and development. They were designed for use by facilitators within a structured professional learning context in Te Kotahitanga.

Contributions and resources

Accelerate reading (image)
Connections and Collaboration Two strategies to accelerate reading
Connections and Collaboration: Two strategies to accelerate reading

This eBook details Pause Prompt Praise and reciprocal teaching, two well-researched and effective reading strategies or smart tools that are consistent with the principles of culturally responsive and relational pedagogies.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Accelerate reading
Accelerate writing (image)
Connections and Collaboration Strategies to accelerate writing
Connections and Collaboration: Strategies to accelerate writing

This eBook details responsive written feedback, a well-researched and effective writing strategy. Four writing structures (structured brainstorming, report writing, recount writing and procedure writing) are also included as a means of promoting greater confidence and writing fluency.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Accelerate writing
Connecting with Māori communities (image)
Connecting with Maori Communities Whanau Hapu and Iwi
Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

This eBooks outlines findings from research literature about how schools can establish relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Connecting with Māori communities
Sustaining change (image)
Sustaining and Spreading Education Reform including marginalised students
Sustaining and Spreading Education Reform: Including marginalised students

This eBook considers how, in many countries and specifically in New Zealand, education has perpetuated the marginalisation of particular groups of students.

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Sustaining change
GEPRISP (image)
GEPRISP
GEPRISP

This eBook outlines the elements of the initial implementation model developed for Te Kotahitanga. These are encapsulated in the acronym GEPRISP: Goal, Experiences, Positioning, Relationships, Interactions, Strategies, and Planning.

Source: Education Counts

GEPRISP

Resources and downloads

Sustaining and Spreading Education Reform: Including marginalised students

Mere Berryman, Margaret Egan and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook considers how, in many countries, and specifically in New Zealand, education has perpetuated the marginalisation of particular groups of students.

Connecting with Māori communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook is hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website. It explores important ideas about creating powerful educational relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. It examines messages from research and provides strategies, tools, resources and videos to help put the ideas into practice.

Connections and Collaboration: Two strategies to accelerate reading

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook presents two strategies to accelerate reading. It connects these principles to the Ka Hikitia strategy, explains the theoretical basis that underpins each strategy, and outlines some implementation guidelines. It also provides a series of video clips to support understanding and implementation.

Connections and Collaboration: Strategies to accelerate writing

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook presents strategies to accelerate writing. It connects these strategies to the principles of Ka Hikitia, explains the theoretical basis that underpins each strategy and outlines some implementation guidelines. It also provides a series of video clips to support understanding and implementation.

GEPRISP

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
This eBook outlines the elements of the initial implementation model (encapsulated in the acronym GEPRISP) developed for Te Kotahitanga: goal, experiences, positioning, relationships, interactions, strategies, and planning.

Effective teaching profile (image)
The Effective Teaching Profile Activities and Resources
The Effective Teaching Profile

This eBook discusses how effective teachers create a culturally appropriate and responsive context for learning in their classrooms.

Source: Education Counts

Effective teaching profile
Observation Tool (image)
Te Kotahitanga Observation Tool
Te Kotahitanga Observation Tool

This eBook backgrounds the development of the Te Kotahitanga Observation Tool. It outlines protocols for conducting a classroom observation using the tool and introduces the process for implementing the cycle of observation, feedback, and co-construction.

Source: Education Counts

Observation Tool
Feedback and shadow coaching (image)
Feedback Co construction and Shadow Coaching
Feedback, Co-construction and Shadow Coaching

For teachers involved in Te Kotahitanga, professional learning and development consisted of a formal classroom observation each term, followed by an individual feedback meeting, a group co-construction meeting, and individual shadow coaching.

Source: Education Counts

Feedback and shadow coaching
Hui Whakarewa 1 (image)
Hui Whakarewa Launching Te Kotahitanga
Hui Whakarewa: Launching Te Kotahitanga

This eBook describes and explains the Hui Whakarewa, at which the school-based facilitation team would launch Te Kotahitanga with staff and (on the final evening) the Māori community.

Source: Education Counts

Hui Whakarewa 1
Hui Whakarewa 2 (image)
Hui Whakarewa Launching Te Kotahitanga with a small cohort of teachers
Hui Whakarewa: Launching Te Kotahitanga with a small cohort of teachers

This eBook explains how small groups of teachers could be inducted into Te Kotahitanga. 

Source: Education Counts

Hui Whakarewa 2

Resources and downloads

The Effective Teaching Profile

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
This eBook discusses the importance and strategies for creating a culturally appropriate and responsive context for learning in their classrooms.

Te Kotahitanga Observation Tool

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
This eBook backgrounds the development of the Te Kotahitanga Observation Tool. It outlines protocols for conducting a classroom observation using the tool and introduces the process for implementing the cycle of observation, feedback, and co-construction.

Feedback, Co-construction and Shadow Coaching

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
For teachers involved in Te Kotahitanga, professional development consisted of a formal classroom observation each term, followed by an individual feedback meeting, a group co-construction meeting, and individual shadow-coaching.

Hui Whakarewa: Launching Te Kotahitanga

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
This eBook describes and explains the Hui Whakarewa, at which the school-based facilitation team would launch Te Kotahitanga with staff and (on the final evening) the Māori community.

Hui Whakarewa: Launching Te Kotahitanga with a small cohort of teachers

Mere Berryman and Robbie Lamont (2013)
This eBook explains how small groups of teachers could be inducted into Te Kotahitanga. This was most likely to be necessary at the start of a school year, when newly appointed staff arrived, unfamiliar with the origins and theoretical foundations of Te Kotahitanga, the elements of GEPRISP, or the Effective Teaching Profile.

Tātaiako (image)
TataiakoCover
Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

Tātaiako is a resource explaining competencies teachers need to develop so they can help Māori learners achieve educational success as Māori.

Source: Education Council

Tātaiako
Grasp, Embrace and Realise (image)
Whakapumautia Papakowhaitia Tau ana 1
Whakapūmautia, Papakōwhaitia, Tau ana: Grasp, Embrace and Realise

This resource aims to transform relationships between iwi and the Ministry of Education as a means of improving Māori educational outcomes.

Source: Ministry of Education

Grasp, Embrace and Realise
Measurable Gains Framework

The Measurable Gains Framework provides tools developed to help unpack what “Māori enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori” looks like in practice.

The tools provide common definitions and measurements of “effectiveness” and “success” (or otherwise), in the context of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

With the tools, the Ministry can evaluate the extent to which a range of activities are making a difference. The information gathered contributes to a better understanding of what works for, and with, Māori students, which is critical if there is to be ongoing improvement in the education sector.

Source: Measurable Gains Framework

Measurable Gains Framework

Resources and downloads

The Measurable Gains Framework

This tool provides common definitions and measurements of “effectiveness” and “success” (or otherwise), in the context of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

This resource is about teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners and with their whānau and iwi. Designed for teachers, it will support your work to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners to ensure they enjoy educational success as Māori.

Whakapūmautia, Papakōwhaitia, Tau Ana – Grasp, Embrace and Realise

This resource promotes the concept of shared responsibility and the diverse layers of influence required in accelerating Maori achievement. It identified “conducting excellent education relationships” as a key focus, with aims to transform relationships between iwi and the Ministry as a means to improving Māori educational outcomes.

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