Welcome to Building on Success.


Research that supports new actions

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/school-leadership-for-educational-success-as-maori/

Leaders need to support their teachers to understand how to engage and unlock the diverse experiences of students in ways that recognise their integrity and mana, and how to utilise the cultural strengths of their learners as part of their processing new learning.

Research that supports new actions for leaders and teachers

This gallery of contributions looks at cultural responsiveness. This term is often used to describe what works for Māori learners in terms of connecting to the identity, language, and culture of learners in order to accelerate achievement. It includes research that leaders and facilitators can use to underpin professional learning with their teachers.

 

Contributions and resources

Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 (image)
BES Ka Hikitia Report FINAL 240615 1 JPEG
Ka Hikitia: A Demonstration Report:
Effectiveness of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 2010–2012

This report analyses the impact of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 on Māori student achievement and explores the design and implementation features that enabled such accelerated improvement. 

It has implications for policy makers, teachers, middle and senior leaders, principals, providers of professional learning, communities, Boards of Trustees, Ministry of Education staff and other government agencies.

Source: Education Counts

Te Kotahitanga Phase 5
BES Case 1 (image)
Case1 Developing Mathematical Communities 1 JPEG
Developing communities of mathematical inquiry – Case 1

Case 1, “Developing communities of mathematical inquiry”, illustrates how two teachers developed teaching practices that were highly effective for diverse learners. The case focuses on how these teachers accelerated the mathematics achievement of their year 4–6 students, most of whom were Māori or Pasifika.

Author: Ministry of Education

Date Published: Only released on Education Counts website, March 2011

Source: Education Counts

BES Case 1
Teacher PLD – BES (image)
TPLandDBESentireWeb 1 JPEG
Teacher Professional Learning and Development – Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration

The Teacher Professional Learning and Development BES illuminates the kind of professional learning for teachers that strengthens valued outcomes for diverse learners.

Authors: H. Timperley, A. Wilson, H. Barrar and I. Fung

Date Published: December 2007

Source: Education Counts

Teacher PLD – BES

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia: A Demonstration Report: Effectiveness of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5

This important research proved the effectiveness of the Te Kotahitanga PLD intervention and contributed to the government’s strategy, Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

BES Case 1: Developing communities of mathematical inquiry

This case dramatically illustrates the benefits of developing a genuine learning community within the peer culture.

Teacher Professional Learning and Development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration

This BES report includes reflection on the important finding that improved student outcomes are often linked to the way teachers think about their students.

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Education Review Office – National Reports

ERO evaluations describe what is working in schools. The reports in this gallery show what is working for Māori learners from a range of perspectives.

Contributions and resources

Achievement 2013–2017
Achievement 2013–2017: Success for students 2013

This report presents the findings of ERO’s evaluation of the Ministry of Education’s initiative Achievement 2013–2017. This initiative was about schools and the Ministry working together to improve student achievement. In particular, groups of year 12 students identified as being unlikely to gain NCEA Level 2 without additional support.

Achievement 2013–2017 has helped schools to become more responsive to the issues affecting student achievement. Most of the schools in this review reported to ERO that their involvement in Achievement 2013–2017 had in some way helped them to improve their focus on individual students. In some cases, schools have made significant changes to their operations.

Source: Education Review Office – National Report
Achievement 2013-2017: Success for Students in 2013 (5/11/2014)

Achievement 2013–2017
Raising Achievement – Primary (image)
RaisingAchievement in Primary School FINAL 1 JPEG
Raising Achievement in Primary Schools (June 2014)

This national report documents how well a sample of primary schools were taking actions to increase the number of students achieving “at” or “above” national standards.

The findings show that half of the schools in the evaluation had used deliberate actions to support students to accelerate progress and sustain achievement.

Source: Education Review Office – National Report
Raising Achievement in Primary Schools (June 2014)

Raising Achievement – Primary
Raising Achievement – Secondary (image)
Raising Achievement in Secondary Schools June 2014 1 JPEG
Raising Achievement in Secondary Schools (June 2014)

This report documents the findings of ERO’s 2013 evaluation of how well 40 secondary schools analysed and responded to their NCEA data.

This report found that approximately one-quarter of secondary schools in this sample (10 out of 40) were effectively using inquiry and improvement approaches. Staff at these schools displayed an urgency and focus to improve student achievement. They showed high-quality analysis skills and, importantly, responded in ways that improved the outcomes for students – including the achievement of targeted groups of learners.

Source: Education Review Office – National Report
Raising Achievement in Secondary Schools (June 2014)

Raising Achievement – Secondary
Partners in Learning
Partners in Learning: Parents’ Voices (September 2008)

This report complements ERO’s evaluation report:

  • Partners in Learning: Good Practice (September 2008).

This report presents the views of parents from diverse communities about their involvement with their children’s schools.

The report highlights what parents and whānau from many different groups told ERO about their engagement with their child’s school. Whatever the parents’ backgrounds, or the needs of their child, clear and consistent messages emerge in relation to parents’ expectations of education.

Source: Education Review Office – National Report
Partners in Learning: Parents’ Voices (September 2008)

Partners in Learning

Resources and downloads

ERO national report – Achievement 2013–2017: Success for Students in 2013

This report references a 2013 research project and comments on the importance of schools building long-term relationships with families and whānau.

ERO national report – Raising Achievement in Primary Schools (June 2014)

This report looks at the achievement of National Standards. It provides advice and comments based on the findings, including notes on the positive impact of leadership.

ERO national report -Raising Achievement in Secondary Schools (June 2014)

This report looks at how well schools used NCEA data. It highlights the work done in one school where there was a significant improvement in Māori achievement.

ERO national report - Partners in Learning: Parents’ voices (September 2008)

This ERO report explores the extent to which schools engage with everyone in their community, not just those already involved and engaged. This report presents the views of parents from diverse communities about their involvement with their children’s schools.

ERO national report - Partners in Learning: Good practice (September 2008)

This report presents case studies of eight schools, identified during ERO reviews that were successful in engaging with their parents, whānau, and the wider community. The report also discusses key factors that contribute to the success of this engagement.

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Guiding documents

This gallery acknowledges that leaders make a significant impact on student learning and achievement, particularly when they promote and/or participate in effective teacher professional learning.

Contributions and resources

National Education Guidelines
The National Education Guidelines (NEGs)

There are 5 components to the National Education Guidelines: National Education Goals, foundation curriculum policy statements, national curriculum statements, National Standards, and National Administration Guidelines (NAGs).

  1. National Education Goals establish a common direction for state education.

  2. Foundation Curriculum Policy Statements are statements of policy concerning teaching, learning, and assessment that are made for the purposes of underpinning and giving direction to: 

    • the way in which curriculum and assessment responsibilities are to be managed in schools
    • national curriculum statements and locally developed curriculum.
  3. National Curriculum Statements are used by schools to make sure that teaching and learning programmes help all students to meet the requirements of the New Zealand Curriculum.

  4. National Standards are standards in regard to literacy and numeracy that are applicable to all students of a particular age or in a particular year of schooling.

  5. National Administration Guidelines (NAGs) are guidelines relating to school administration and may (without limitation): 

    • set out statements of desirable codes or principles of conduct or administration for specified kinds or descriptions of person or body, including guidelines for the purposes of section 61
    • set out requirements relating to planning and reporting, including communicating the Government's policy objectives
    • set out transitional provisions for the purposes of national administration guidelines.

Source: Ministry of Education

National Education Guidelines
Education Act 1989 (image)
Education Act 1989 1 JPEG
Education Act 1989

The National Education Guidelines are defined by Section 60A of the Education Act 1989.

Source: Legislation.govt.nz

Education Act 1989
Effective governance (image)
supportingeducationsuccessasmaori 1 1 JPEG
Effective governance: Supporting Educational Success as Māori

This resource has been developed for boards of English-medium schools. It aims to help boards to empower their school to take positive action. Whether your school has only a few Māori students or Māori students are the majority, they have a legal right to effective education under the Treaty of Waitangi and their success is critical to New Zealand’s school system. This resource provides further resources and assistance that will help you steer your school's journey towards Māori enjoying educational success as Māori.

Source: New Zealand School Trustees Association Te Whakaroputanga Kaitiaki Kura O Aotearoa

Effective governance
Leadership and Outcomes (image)
BES Leadership Web updated foreword 2015 1 JPEG
School Leadership and Student Outcomes: What Works and Why (BES)

This synthesis of 134 New Zealand and overseas research studies or reviews was developed collaboratively using Ministry of Education guidelines. Professor Viviane Robinson and Dr Margie Hohepa at the University of Auckland were lead writers for this synthesis of effective leadership practices.

The big finding of the BES is that when school leaders promote and/or participate in effective teacher professional learning, this has twice the impact on student outcomes across a school than any other leadership activity.

Authors: Viviane Robinson, Margie Hohepa, Claire Lloyd (The University of Auckland)

Date Published: November 2009

Source: Education Counts

Leadership and Outcomes

Resources and downloads

The National Education Guidelines (NEGs)

This link will take you to the Ministry of Education’s web page on National Education Guidelines (NEGs).

Effective governance: Supporting educational success as Māori

This 2013 New Zealand Board of Trustees publication sets the scene for school leaders to consider the achievement of their Māori students.

School Leadership and Student Outcomes: What Works and Why (BES)

This important research report provides evidence to guide leaders on “what works and why” as they aim to achieve the best outcomes for all learners
Author(s): Viviane Robinson, Margie Hohepa, Claire Lloyd [The University of Auckland]
Date Published: November 2009

The centrality of relationships for pedagogy: The whānaungatanga thesis

Russell Bishop [University of Waikato], James Ladwig [Newcastle University], Mere Berryman [University of Waikato], November 2013
This paper explores the concept of whānaungatanga as an essential component of pedagogical quality.

New Zealand Education Act 1989

A link to the online publication of New Zealand Education Act 1989, Public Act 1989 No. 80

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.