Welcome to Building on Success.


Sharing responsibility for educational success as Ngā Iwi

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/sharing-responsibility-for-educational-success-as-nga-iwi/

This kete uses the term "Nga Iwi" to encourage educators to move away from thinking about the more generic term “Māori”. This emphasises a move towards a relationship and understanding of iwi as mana whenua sharing responsibility with schools.

From one iwi to the next, the mana whenua are recognised as the guardians of the land. From a Māori perspective their worldly power and prestige as guardians and holders of the land, must continue to be acknowledged and respected.” – Connecting with Māori Communities by Berryman and Ford (2014)

Mapping current relationships

This gallery offers a view of ways in which school leaders and teachers can reflect on their home–school interactions with Māori whānau, hapū, and iwi members.

Contributions and resources

Mapping relationships
IBRLA relationships framework

In Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi,  Berryman and Ford  (2014) utilise a IBRLA framework proposed by Bishop and Glynn (1999).  Using this five-pronged framework, which examines power relationships, allows better mapping and planning of relationship models.

The five focus areas and questions are set out below.  Download a resource worksheet from the source link for further explanation and suggestions for how best to implement this tool.

  1. Initiation

    • Who initiates home-school and/or community-school interactions?
    • How are the relationships established?
    • Whose interests or experiences are paramount?
    • How is power-sharing initiated?
  2. Benefits

    • Who will benefit from power-sharing arrangements?
    • In what way will our Māori community (whānau, hapū, iwi) participate in power-sharing?
  3. Representation

    • Whose cultural reality is current?
    • In what ways do interaction processes facilitate authentic “voice”?
    • In what ways will our Māori community (whānau, hapū, iwi) share in the co-construction of the curriculum?
  4. Legitimation

    • Whose realities and experiences are legitimate?
    • What authority does the relationship have?
    • How do we know this?
  5. Accountability

    • Who are the participants (teachers, school leaders, and Māori communities) accountable to?
    • How is this accountability demonstrated?
    • How do we know this? (What is our evidence?)

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi by Berryman and Ford (2014)

Mapping relationships
Listen (video)
Be ready to listen rather than expect to speak

Whenever you engage with Māori, be good hosts. Follow tikanga and listen respectfully to what they want to
 say. Listen so that you can work with, and not against, Māori communities.

Click on source to view key content and associated resources.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi (Berryman and Ford 2014)

Listen
Participation in cultural events

In this sabbatical leave report, Bruce Pagan, Principal of Kaikoura Primary School, investigates the effects and/or benefits that the pursuit of culturally significant events can have on Māori student achievement. He makes  particular reference to those families and students that engage regularly in hui, muttonbirding, and carving.

Questions or things to think about:

  1. What events does your community consider culturally significant?

  2. Who in the community may hold the knowledge surrounding these events?

  3. How can the school find opportunities to engage with whānau and iwi about culturally significant events?

  4. How do you engage with students about culturally significant events?

Source: Investigating the effects/benefits that the pursuit of culturally significant events can have on Māori student achievement by Bruce Pagan (Principal, Kaikoura Primary School)

Participation in cultural events

Resources and downloads

Connecting with Māori communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook is hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website. It explores important ideas about creating powerful educational relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. It examines messages from research and provides strategies, tools, resources and videos to help put the ideas into practice.

Understanding the impact of culturally significant events on Māori student achievement

Bruce Pagan, Principal, Kaikoura Primary School
In this report, a primary school principal explores the effects and/or benefits of Māori students engaging in events that have cultural significance to their whānau, hapū, or iwi.

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Iwi learning initiatives

This gallery looks at how iwi also undertake educational initiatives with their tamariki to support their educational success as Ngā Iwi.

Contributions and resources

Mahi Tahi
Engaging with Māori: Voices from Kia Eke Panuku – Leading the Change


Relationships with mana whenua and iwi

The iwi might say ‘we would like to have a relationship with you, but it has to be two way. It’s not one-way traffic.’ Kia Eke Panuku is an opportunity for iwi to share their education plans and aspirations for their tamariki and mokopuna. It’s not just what do schools want from iwi; it’s how can we work together to meet those aspirations? 

Kia Eke Panuku ; Source: Voices: Mahi Tahi collection – Engaging with Maori

Source: Kia Eke Panuku

Mahi Tahi
Huakina Mai

Kamo High School students, whānau, teachers, and board of trustees have joined forces to establish a science “academy” for Ngātiwai year 9 students, and others interested. The aim is to share Ngātiwai mātauranga (cultural heritage) with a focus on kaitiakitanga (guardianship). Kamo HOD science Hazel McIntosh and Ngātiwai Pūtaiao project leader Gayle Wellington share their thoughts on the programme so far.

Source: PPTA – news August 2015

Huakina Mai
Iti Kahurangi (video)
Developing the Rangitāne Education Curriculum for year 7–8

Developing the Rangitāne Education Curriculum for year 7–8 by Rangitāne o Wairarapa.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Rangitāne o Wairarapa

Iti Kahurangi
Akona Rangitāne II

This beautiful website contains plenty of educational material about Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Māori of the Wairarapa region.

The website has a rich set of resources from early childhood stories to videos and education sheets.

These resources cover a range of topics including:

  1. local Māori history

  2. mythology 

  3. world views

  4. tikanga

  5. basic te reo Māori

  6. the natural world

  7. basic needs (that is, food and social structure).

Akona Rangitāne II

Resources and downloads

Voices: Mahi Tahi collection

These 16 A5 PDF documents were written by the Kia Eke Panuku team academic directors and kaitoro and reflect their understanding and experience of the Kia Eke Panuku institutions.

A passion for pūtaiao

This article from PPTA News describes the partnership between Ngātiwai iwi and Kamo High School. The joint project aimed to share Ngātiwai mātauranga (cultural heritage) in a science “academy” for year 9 science students.

Developing the Rāngitane Education Curriculum for year 7–8 by Rangitāne o Wairarapa

This YouTube video gives an overview of a project between Rangitane o Wairarapa and three schools in their role to develop a local curriculum.

Ngāti Whanaunga working with Thames South School

This publication describes how and why Ngāti Whanaunga iwi provides culturally responsive learning and development programmes for Thames South School.

Akona Rangitāne II – Rangitāne o Wairarapa Education

This beautiful website contains plenty of educational material about Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Māori of the Wairarapa region. It has a rich set of resources from early childhood stories to videos and education sheets.

Ngā Moana and Koha – a resource for schools

This publication shows how Ngā Moana iwi in Tauranga developed a resource for Mt Maunganui College and introduced the principal to key places of their role.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.