Welcome to Building on Success.


Sharing stories

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/sharing-stories/

Te Kotahitanga and other research studies have shown the importance of developing relationships that reflect whanaungatanga.

This encompasses the use of learning strategies that allow students to bring their cultural experiences to their learning, to be able to learn collaboratively, to be clear about their learning in each lesson and to share the responsibility for success.

The stories shared in this kete include videos that exemplify effective learning strategies.

Whanaungatanga case studies

In these case studies, watch and listen for what whanaungatanga sounds like in the classroom. Whanaungatanga mirrors the relationships valued by Māori communities.

Contributions and resources

Anjali’s story 1 (video)
Anjali’s story – Relationships, part 1

Comments are provided by a mathematics teacher, her students, and a Te Kotahitanga facilitator about the teacher’s realisation that her traditional teaching practice was not effective for Māori students.

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with Anjali’s story.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga – Anjali’s story

Anjali’s story 1
Anjali’s story 2 (video)
Anjali’s story – Relationships, part 2

Comments are provided by a mathematics teacher, her students, and a Te Kotahitanga facilitator about the way in which the teacher worked to build relationships with her Māori students and the benefits this brought.

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with Anjali’s story.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga – Anjali’s story 2

Anjali’s story 2
Donna, Amy, and Delina’s story (video)
Donna, Amy, and Delina’s story

In this art department, students are highly engaged and participating successfully. Comments are provided by three teachers who discuss their relationships with students and their pedagogy.

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with this story.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga – Donna, Amy, and Delina’s story

Donna, Amy, and Delina’s story
Agnes and Rangimarie’s story (video)
Agnes and Rangimarie’s story

Two teachers from distinctly different cultural backgrounds highlight the importance of being culturally responsive. They share their high expectations with students and provide structured opportunities for them to succeed.

No captions or transcript available

Source: He Kākano

Agnes and Rangimarie’s story
Agentic positioning (video)
John’s story – Agentic positioning

Comments are provided by a mathematics teacher, his Māori students, and Russell Bishop about agentic positioning. In this model, teachers believe they have the power to make a difference for Māori students.

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with John’s story.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga – John’s story

Agentic positioning

Resources and downloads

Anjali’s story – Relationships, part 1

A mathematics teacher, her students, and a Te Kotahitanga facilitator comment on the teacher’s realisation that her traditional teaching practice was not effective for Māori students.

Anjali’s story – Relationships, part 2

A mathematics teacher, her students, and a Te Kotahitanga facilitator comment on the way in which the teacher worked to build relationships with her Māori students and the benefits this brought.

John’s story – Agentic positioning

A mathematics teacher, his Māori students, and Russell Bishop talk about agentic positioning. “Agentic positioning” is the term used to describe the belief that teachers have the power to make a difference for Māori students.

Donna, Amy and Delina’s story

Acknowledging the importance of relationships and listening to students ensures that staff in the Art Department of Alfriston College can support students in the challenge that is learning. “Peeling back the layers of doubt”, these teachers instil self-confidence and self-belief, building student success into the senior levels.

Agnes and Rangimarie’s story

Two teachers from distinctly different cultural backgrounds talk about the importance of being culturally responsive.

Culture counts 1 (video)
Culture counts 1

Research shows that bringing students’ cultural contexts into the curriculum affirms their identity and validates their cultural knowledge and knowledge of their whānau. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Culture counts 1
Culture counts 2 (video)
Culture counts 2

Culturally responsive learning contexts are those in which the learner can bring their own experiences into the classroom context. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Culture counts 2
Culturally responsive practice (video)
Culturally responsive practice

This video shows Ruawai teacher Karen Matich explaining how she included in her literacy programme the local kōrero of how five mountains took their place in the landscape. The culmination of this unit was the retelling of the kōrero to an audience.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Culturally responsive practice
John’s story (video)
John’s story – Changing the classroom environment

This video is from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection. It explores how maths teacher Tony Renshaw from Rotorua Lakes High School changed his classroom environment to overcome students’ reluctance to participate. He describes some of the approaches he adopted and the responsibilities he shared with his students.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

John’s story
Building trust, setting expectations (video)
Building trust, setting expectations

This video from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection features contributions from a Northland-based literacy advisor and staff from Kapiti College and Rotorua Lakes High School. It considers how the starting point for a positive relationship between a teacher and a student can be some simple courtesies.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Building trust, setting expectations

Resources and downloads

Culture counts 1

This video from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection explores such concepts as what is deemed to be ‘cultural’ and the nature ‘ako’. It includes how the views of students and whānau needed to be validated and be seen as relevant when shaping the community’s expectations.
It features a range of contributions from the staff, board, parents/whānau, and students of Tolaga Bay Area School. Contributions from Professor Mason Durie and Senior Lecturer Wally Penetito are also included.

Culture counts 2

This video from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection features staff, students, and parents/whānau from Kerikeri High School and Opunake Primary School, as well as contributions from Senior Lecturer Wally Penetito.
It considers what is involved in creating a culturally responsive context and the role of co-construction, where the child, student, or learner is free to bring their own experiences into that classroom context. It acknowledges that those experiences need to have validity, be valued, and become part of the process of what goes on in the classroom.

Culturally responsive practice

This video from the Ministry’s 2009 Te Mana Kōrero response features Ruawai Primary School in Northland, as well as contributions from Dr Russell Bishop and teachers from Whangarei Intermediate and Kapiti College.
It includes Ruawai teacher Karen Matich explaining how she included in her literacy programme the local kōrero of how five mountains took their place in the landscape. The culmination of this unit was the retelling of the kōrero to an audience.

Changing the classroom environment

This video from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection explores how maths teacher Tony Renshaw, from Rotorua Lakes High School, changed his classroom environment as part of his goal to overcome students’ reluctance to participate. He describes some of the approaches he adopted and the responsibilities he shared with his students.

Building trust, setting expectation

This video from the 2009 Te Mana Kōrero collection features contributions from a Northland-based literacy advisor and staff from Kapiti College and Rotorua Lakes High School. It considers how the starting point for developing a positive relationship between a teacher and student can take the form of some simple courtesies.

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Interactive teaching strategies

In these case studies, watch and listen for what whanaungatanga sounds like in the classroom. Whanaungatanga mirrors the relationships valued by Māori communities.

 

… it is not socio-economic differences that have the greatest effect on Māori student achievement … the evidence is pointing more to the relationships between teachers and Māori students as the major issue.

 

Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017, Overview

Contributions and resources

Understanding social influences (video)
Claire’s story – Understanding social influences

This video is from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection. It features dance teacher Claire, who looks at her role in helping students to “see outside their world” to the broader range of opportunities that exist for them. 

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with this story.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kotahitanga

Understanding social influences
Students leading the learning (video)
Tu‘u’s story – Students leading the learning

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features maths teacher Tu’u.  It explores how he shares power with his students, enabling them to lead the learning.

To get the most out of this video, click the source below to view key content and focus questions associated with this story.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kotahitanga

Students leading the learning
Students taking ownership (video)
Jane’s story – Students taking ownership

In this video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection, English teacher Jane comments on how she encouraged her year 9 class to take ownership of their learning.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kotahitanga

Students taking ownership
Exploring ako (video)
Ruth’s story – Exploring ako

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features comments from maths teacher Ruth, who was also a Te Kotahitanga facilitator. She reflects on her own experiences of school as a Māori student.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education – Te Kotahitanga

Exploring ako

Resources and downloads

Claire’s story – Understanding social influences

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features dance teacher Claire, who looks at her role in helping students to “see outside their world” to the broader range of opportunities that exist for them. It considers how the impact of wider social influences on students is central to how this teacher operates.

Tu‘u’s story – Students leading the learning

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features mathematics teacher Tu‘u. It explores how he shares power with his students, enabling them to lead the learning. It shows how, each day, he uses a range of diagnostic questions to help the students to identify for themselves the levels at which they need to engage with their learning. The example of manaakitanga in this classroom demonstrates the students’ trust in asking for and receiving the help they need.

Jane’s story – Students taking ownership

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features year 9 English teacher, Jane. She comments on how she encouraged her year 9 class to take ownership of their learning and how establishing effective contexts for learning requires teachers to value learners.

Ruth’s story – Exploring ako

This video from the 2012 Te Kotahitanga collection features comments from mathematics teacher Ruth, who was also a Te Kotahitanga facilitator. She reflects on her own experiences of school as a Māori student.
Contributions are also included from her students, as well as Associate Professor Mere Berryman and Dr Russell Bishop. These look at the importance of developing self-belief in students through bringing the concept of ako into the classroom.

Inquiry cycle
A student-led inquiry – Homai Primary School

This resource from Literacy Online is centred around a student-led chemistry inquiry that focuses on how students reflect on their learning and determine their next steps.

The story is broken down into the four phases of inquiry cycle:  

  1. Phase 1 – Focusing inquiry

    What do my students need to learn? The focusing inquiry establishes a baseline and a direction.

  2. Phase 2 – Teaching inquiry

    The teacher uses evidence from research, her own practice, and that of colleagues to plan teaching and learning opportunities aimed at achieving the outcomes prioritised in the focusing inquiry.

  3. Phase 3 – Teaching and learning

    What happened as a result of the teaching?

  4. Phase 4 – Learning inquiry

    What are the implications for future teaching?

Source: Literacy Online – A student-led inquiry

Inquiry cycle
Constructing knowledge

Moira teaches a year 3 class in a large, multicultural, decile 5 school. She is the school’s teacher in charge of mathematics. She focused her inquiry on eight students, most of whom were Māori or Pasifika; the others were Middle Eastern, Indian, and Pākehā. Many were English language learners.

Moira’s inquiry question was:

Will introducing problem-based tasks improve the mathematics achievement of lower-performing students?

Source: NZC Online – Learning stories – Story 5
Constructing knowledge
Engaging cultural identity

Raewynne is an experienced teacher at a decile 3 school.

Her inquiry focused on two groups of year 5 and 6 students for whom she was providing literacy assistance away from their regular classrooms. Within this context, the focus was on social sciences and, in particular, the students’ understandings of the concepts of “cultural identity” and “cultural transmission”. The students were predominantly Māori and Pasifika, and Raewynne chose two students from each group as her target students.

Her inquiry question was:

How can I use Māori and Pasifika students’ past experiences, knowledge, and culture to enhance their achievement and learning?

Source: NZC Online – Learning stories – Story 6
Engaging cultural identity
Culturally responsive pedagogies

Greg teaches year 8 students at a decile 6 intermediate school. His inquiry involved students in two year 8 classes, 14 percent of whom were Māori or Pasifika. One of these was his own class, and the other was a colleague’s. Greg conducted his inquiry alongside Mike, a colleague who was also participating in QTR&D and who was inquiring into the use of drama in science teaching.

Greg’s inquiry question was:

Does teaching science using the Māori metaphor of ako as a teaching pedagogy help year 8 students understand scientific concepts?

Source: NZC Online – Learning stories – Story 3
Culturally responsive pedagogies

Resources and downloads

A student-led inquiry – Homai Primary School

This set of videos is available on the Ministry of Education’s Literacy Online web presence.
They illustrate how Homai Primary School teacher Melissa Sotelo used effective formative assessment strategies to support students to lead their learning and to work as peer leaders.

NZC Online – Teachers as learners: Inquiry – Learning stories

The seven learning stories in this NZC Online collection illustrate parts of the learning journeys of seven teachers. Each teacher grappled with the concepts of collaborative inquiry, cultural responsiveness, and pedagogical content knowledge and with how they could better enable their Māori and Pasifika students to achieve success.

Newton Central School (video)
A culture of trust and relationships

The first in a series of seven videos from Newton Central discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Newton Central School
Porangahau School (video)
Productive partnerships

The first in a series of nine videos from Porangahau School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Porangahau School
Breens Intermediate (video)
Belonging and being bold, brilliant, brave, and beautiful

The first in a series of four videos from Breens Intermediate School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Breens Intermediate
Te Karaka Area School (video)
Living the Treaty of Waitangi

The first in a series of seven videos from Te Karaka Area School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Te Karaka Area School
Makoura College (video)
Mana Māori

The first in a series of five videos from Makoura College discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here.

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Makoura College

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia case studies

This series of case studies tells the stories of five schools that have engaged in making a difference for their Māori students. It includes 32 videos, key focus points, and questions. The case studies are intended as a conversation starter for teachers, whānau, boards of trustees, principals and parents.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.