Welcome to Building on Success.


Strong school and whānau connections

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/strong-school-and-whanau-connections/

To date, it has been schools that have mostly determined the way that they interact with whānau. Research and experience now shows that this needs to change so that whānau can take a more active role in shaping this relationship.

Research and reports that support partnerships

This gallery links to specific research sources that address the influence that whānau can contribute to the educational success of their children. This research has informed the guiding policy, Ka Hikitia, as well as the PLD responses.

Contributions and resources

Education for Māori (image)
education for maori 1
Education for Māori: Relationships between schools and whānau

This report brings together information about the relationships between families and schools and includes examples of effective practice. It supports educators as they consider the relationships they have with whānau.

Source: Controller and Auditor General – Education for Māori

Education for Māori
Promoting success (image)
Promoting Success for Maori Students Schools Progress 2010 1
Promoting Success for Māori Students: Schools’ progress

This ERO report provides important information about three critical dimensions for the success of Māori students: presence, engagement and achievement.

A common characteristic of successful schools was the inclusion of parents and whānau.

Source: Education Review Office – Promoting Success for Māori Students

Promoting success
What works (image)
BES Leadership Web updated foreword 2015 147
What works in terms of school–home interactions

This BES report School Leadership and Student Outcomes includes Figure 24: Findings of a meta-analysis of research on the educational impact of making connections between schools, families/whānau and communities.

Source: Education Counts – BES School Leadership and Student Outcomes: Identifying what works and why (p. 144)

What works
Whānau information needs (image)
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Parents, Families and Whānau, and their information needs

This 2012 Colmar Brunton report for the Ministry of Education offers useful insights to help schools identify what parents want and how they can strengthen communication between school and home.

Source: Education Counts – Parents, Families and Whānau and Their Information Needs research report

Whānau information needs
Whānau contributions (image)
Parents family and whanau contributions 1
Parents’, Families’ and Whānau Contributions to Educational Success

This 2013 report from the Children’s Commissioner examines the role of families and whānau in the educational success of their children.

Working paper

Summary paper

Source: Office of the Children’s Commissioner – Parents’, Families’ and Whānau Contributions to Educational Success

Whānau contributions

Resources and downloads

Education for Māori: Relationships between schools and whānau

This report brings together information about relationships between families and schools, including examples of effective practice. It supports educators as they consider the relationships they have with whānau.

Promoting Success for Māori Students: Schools’ progress

This ERO report provides important information about three critical dimensions for the success of Māori students.

School Leadership and Student Outcomes: Identifying what works and why: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration

Viviane Robinson, Margie Hohepa, Claire Lloyd (The University of Auckland, 2009)
This important BES research report provides evidence to guide leaders on “what works and why” as they aim to achieve the best outcomes for all learners. It includes information schools can use to inform their own strategies for home-school partnerships.

Parents, families and whānau and their information needs

This 2012 Colmar Brunton report for the Ministry of Education offers useful insights to help schools identify what parents want and how they can strengthen communication between school and home.

Parents’, familes’ and whānau contributions to educational success

This 2013 paper from the Office of the Children’s Commissioner examines the roles of families and whānau in the educational success of their children.

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Guiding documents that support partnerships

This gallery brings together a range of key documents of interest to schools. All these documents play an important role in informing thinking about building whānau connections.

Contributions and resources

Ka Hikitia – productive partnerships (image)
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Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 – productive partnerships

The productive partnerships principle of this strategy provides guidance for schools as they work to improve connections with their parents and whānau.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia – productive partnerships
Guiding principle (image)
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Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 – productive partnerships

Productive partnerships is one of the five core principles that guide the Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 strategy.

Source: Ministry of Education –
Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Guiding principle
Critical factors (image)
KHCriticalFactors
Description

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 focuses on driving two critical factors through the education system. Evidence shows that improvement in these two areas will make the most powerful difference to Māori students’ educational success.

Source: Ministry of Education –
Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Critical factors
Where it starts

A productive partnership starts with the understanding that Māori children and students are connected to whānau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated, or disconnected. 

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017
Where it starts

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia is a strategy to guide actions that will make a significant difference for Māori students in education for these five years and beyond. We know Māori students do much better when education reflects and values their identity, language and culture. This is a central focus within Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

Effective governance (image)
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Effective Governance: Supporting education success as Māori

This report by the New Zealand School Trustees Association helps schools to examine alignment between the Treaty of Waitangi and Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

Source: NZSTA – Effective Governance: Supporting education success as Māori (MoE, 2013)

Effective governance
Key messages from research

In this eBook, Berryman and Ford explore some of the key messages from the guiding documents and research on building effective home–school and home–community relationships.  Discussion of the research documents includes:

  1. Ka Hikitia and connecting with Māori communities (page 4)

  2. Key messages from chapter 7 of the School Leadership BES (page 5)

  3. Key messages from the Family and Community Engagement BES (page 9)

Key messages from research

Resources and downloads

Connecting with Māori communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Mere Berryman and Therese Ford (2014)
This eBook is hosted on the Kia Eke Panuku website. It explores important ideas about creating powerful educational relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. It examines messages from research and provides strategies, tools, resources and videos to help put the ideas into practice.

Effective governance: Supporting educational success as Māori

This 2013 New Zealand Board of Trustees publication sets the scene for school leaders to consider the achievement of their Māori students.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.