Welcome to Building on Success.


Thinking and being different

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/thinking-and-being-different/

Much work has been done to explore and support different ways of thinking about the factors and attitudes that have an impact on the educational achievement of Māori learners. Rather than doing more of “what we’ve always done”, the voices and commentaries in this kete show that thinking differently about the way we connect and engage Māori learners can lead to better relationships and improved learner outcomes.

Thinking differently for improved outcomes

This gallery contains reports, articles, and videos that consider what is needed to improve outcomes for Māori learners. They include data from schools that are making a difference.

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.

Albert Einstein

Contributions and resources

Meeting needs
Meeting the needs of Māori within mainstream education

This report from a school principal identifies the issues school leaders need to address and support the identity, language and culture.

… we have National Standards we have Priority Learners, we have the new Teacher Registration Criteria. Principals, as the professional leaders, are the ones who must make the first difference for Māori students in our schools by developing a “culturally responsive curriculum” within our schools.

Brian Eales, Principal of Clive School (Decile 7 Hawke’s Bay) ; Source: “Culturally responsive curriculum”: Meeting the needs of Māori students in mainstream education
Meeting needs
Place-based education
Place-based Education: Catering for curriculum, culture and community

Educator Wally Penetito explores the role of “place-based” education in New Zealand to cater for the curriculum, culture, and community.

This research paper poses questions and discusses identity (who am I?) and location (where am I?). Penetito outlines a convincing case that place-based education benefits not just Māori learners but all students.

Source: Victoria University of Wellington
Penetito, W. (2009). New Zealand Annual Review of Education, 18, pp. 5–29.

Place-based education
Realising potential
Realising Māori student potential

Improving educational outcomes for Māori students

In this 2012 paper, New Plymouth Boy’s High School principal Michael McMenamin outlines research-based initiatives. He focuses in particular on the practices of four secondary schools that are making an impact on educational outcomes for Māori students.

Source: Ministry of Education – Educational Leaders

Realising potential
Focus on Māori students (video)
Focus on Māori students

Challenging the dominant discourse of a focus on all students to focus on students less well served by the education system has resulted in improved achievement for Māori and for all students.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga

Focus on Māori students
What’s good for Māori (video)
What’s good for Māori

Te Kotahitanga data shows that over time, as teachers become more experienced with the effective teaching profile, Māori students have improved their achievement and so too have non-Māori students.

View transcript

Source: Te Kotahitanga

What’s good for Māori

Resources and downloads

Meeting the needs of Māori within mainstream education

This report from a school principal identifies the issues school leaders need to address to support students' identity, language and culture.

Place-Based Education: Catering for Curriculum, Culture and Community

Educator Wally Penetito explores the role of “place-based” education in New Zealand to cater for the curriculum, culture and community

Realising Māori student potential

This 2012 paper from secondary school principal Michael McMenamin describes the initiatives and outcomes for Māori students at four secondary schools.

Te Kotahitanga – What’s good for Māori

This video addresses the benefits of focusing on Māori students and points out that the results are worth the wait and improve the achievement of non-Māori students as well.

Te Kotahitanga – Focus on Māori students

This video addresses the benefits of focusing on Māori students, and points out that the results are worth the wait and affect all students.

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Using data to drive improvement

This gallery looks at the ways evidence is used increasingly to set goals that focus on equitable outcomes.  Monitoring systems guide the use of focused interventions where the evidence shows specific needs.

Contributions and resources

Te Kākahu
Building on Success: Te Kākahu – digging into issues of equity

Te Kākahu is a professional learning and development (PLD) response, working directly with whānau, hapū, and iwi in up to 10 schools within the Whanganui rohe over 2014-16. It is led by Te Puna Mātauranga o Whanganui and Cognition Education Ltd.

Te Kākahu draws on iwi capability to shift Māori perspectives within curriculum towards a place-based, iwi-centred curriculum. It aims to normalise local tikanga and knowledge within classrooms and school culture.

Source: New Zealand Curriculum Online

Te Kākahu
School data (video)
Collecting and using school data

Former Principal Chris Day provides insights into his experiences with school data and its effective use.

View transcript

Source: He Kākano

School data
Impacting outcomes (video)
Impacting Māori student achievement outcomes

Practitioners reflect on the impact of professional development that is focused on improving Māori learning outcomes. (Extract from Te Mana Kōrero: Strengthening Professional Practice, 2005).

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Impacting outcomes
Critical reflection (video)
Critical reflection – Te Mana Kōrero

This video looks at the need to gather data widely and analyse it closely to inform teaching and learning decisions.

A feature of effective professional learning is critical reflection on practice. At Greymouth High School and Waitara Primary School, teachers are opening up their classrooms to others for peer observation and feedback. (Extract from Te Mana Korero: Strengthening professional practice, 2005).

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Critical reflection

Resources and downloads

Te Kākahu – Digging into issues of equity

This iwi-led response to the PLD initiative Te Kākahu includes a tool developed by iwi and whānau with schools in the Whanganui rohe. It is used to find out more about Māori learners in up to ten secondary schools.

Collecting and using data

This video from the He Kākano response features an iwi-developed tool that is used in ten secondary schools to help understand more about Māori learners.

Impacting Māori student achievement outcomes

This video explores what teachers have learned from a PLD programme to improve outcomes for Māori learners.

Critical reflection

This video looks at the need to gather data widely and analyse it closely to inform teaching and learning decisions.

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Voices to improve learning outcomes

This gallery shows how voices other than those of teachers and leaders can influence the experience that learners have in the classroom. Voices of learners and whānau are highlighted.

Contributions and resources

NZC Ka Hikitia blog series
A closer look at Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

NZC Online offers a series of blogs about Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

The blog posts look closely at different aspects of the Māori education strategy and provides questions, resources, and suggested actions for school leaders and kaiako.

Use the links below to view each blog in this series on the NZC Online site.

  1. Part 1: Productive partnerships  

    This blog examines the principle of productive partnerships and includes links to inspirational school stories and resources. Developing productive partnerships with whānau, hapū, and iwi is a key focus of the content.

  2. Part 2: Māori potential approach and educational pathways 

    This blog explores the Māori potential approach principle and offers links to resources that promote high expectations and strong educational pathways for Māori students.

  3. Part 3: An interview with Wharehoka Wano 

    This third and final blog post is an interview with Wharehoka Wano, Kaihautū Māori at CORE, who shares his views about the strategy and offers some practical advice.

NZC Ka Hikitia blog series
The Māori education experience (video)
Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead – The Māori education experience

Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead describe their early teaching experiences and why there is a need for programmes like He Kākano. They observe that while there have been areas of improvement, there are still issues related to Māori education that seem resistant to change. 

View transcript

Source: He Kākano

The Māori education experience
Setting expectations (video)
Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead – Setting expectations

In this video, respected educators Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead reflect on the contributions whānau, hapū, and iwi make and on the importance of expectations in raising achievement for Māori learners.

View transcript

Source: He Kākano

Setting expectations
Good for all students (video)
Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead – What’s good for Māori students is good for all students

In this video, respected educator Sir Sidney Mead outlines his aspirations for all rangatahi, including non-Māori.

View transcript

Source: He Kakano

Good for all students

Resources and downloads

A closer look at Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The first in an NZC Online series of blogs. This blog examines the principle of productive partnerships and includes links to inspirational school stories and resources. Developing productive partnerships with whānau, hapū, and iwi is a key focus of the content.

A second look at Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The second in an NZC Online series of blogs. This blog explores the Māori potential approach principle and offers links to resources that promote high expectations and strong educational pathways for Māori students.

One more look at Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The third blog in the NZC Online blog series, this contains an interview with Wharehoka Wano, Kaihautū Māori at CORE, who shares his views about the strategy and offers practical advice.

Setting expectations

In this video, respected educators Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead reflect on the contributions whānau, hapū, and iwi make and on the importance of expectations in raising achievement for Māori learners.

What’s good for Māori students is good for all students

In this video, respected educator Sir Sidney Mead outlines his aspirations for rangatahi, including non-Māori.

The Māori education experience

In this video, Sir Sidney and Lady June Mead describe their early teaching experiences and why there is a need for programmes like He Kākano. They observe that while there have been areas of improvement, there are still issues related to Māori education that seem resistant to change.

Narratives from Culture Speaks (image)
Connecting with Maori Communities Whanau Hapu and Iwi
Connecting with Māori Communities: Understanding power and partnerships

Download 5: Narratives from Culture Speaks

Narratives from whānau contained within Culture Speaks (Bishop and Berryman, 2006) provide some valuable insights into Māori parent’s experiences of engagement or the lack of it with schools. Use these five extracts and discussion frameworks across your team. Compare and contrast them and consider what you have learned about connecting with Māori communities.

Source: Connecting with Māori Communities: Whānau, hapū and iwi

Narratives from Culture Speaks
Student voices (video)
Student voices

In this video from the Te Kotahitanga response, students share their experiences of the changes their teachers made and what these meant to them.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Student voices
Bringing about change (video)
Bringing about change

In this video, former regional coordinator Raewin Tipene-Clark describes the work she and her colleagues undertook with school management teams to help improve Māori student learning outcomes.

View transcript

Source: Ministry of Education

Bringing about change
Distributed leadership (video)
Distributed leadership

In this video, staff at Hillmorton School discuss their team approach and the importance of looking beyond a short-term focus.

No captions or transcript available

Source: Ministry of Education

Distributed leadership

Resources and downloads

Narratives from Culture Speaks

Te Kotahitanga eBook Connecting with Māori Communities, chapter 8: Understanding Power and Partnerships, page 29, download 5.
Narratives from whānau contained within Culture Speaks (Bishop & Berryman, 2006) provide some valuable insights into Māori parent’s experiences of engagement or lack of it with schools. Teachers can use these five extracts and discussion frameworks across their team and compare and contrast the findings.

Student voices

In this video from the Te Kotahitanga response, students share their experiences of the changes their teachers made and what these meant to them.

Bringing about change

In this video, former regional coordinator Raewin Tipene-Clark describes the work she and her colleagues undertook with school management teams to help improve Māori student learning outcomes.

Distributed leadership

In this video, staff at Hillmorton School discuss their team approach and the importance of looking beyond a short-term focus.

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