Welcome to Building on Success.


Towards educational success for Māori: the policy story

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/toward-educational-success-for-maori-the-policy-story/

There have been (and still are) many worthwhile initiatives in schools and communities that contribute to the policy intent of Ka Hikitia. We honour and respect the people associated with those initiatives – students, teachers, whānau members, iwi representatives, subject matter experts, educationalists, and Ministry staff. Their contributions have informed the thinking and the knowledge base that continues to underpin Ka Hikitia.

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Crown leadership

The Treaty of Waitangi and Māori education policy prior to Ka Hikitia

Our knowledge about what works for Māori learners and why has been shaped by iwi, hapū, whānau, parents, principals, school leaders, teachers, students, educationalists, and many others who have shared their thinking and work over the years.

This gallery highlights some of the important milestones in education policy and strategy development prior to the first iteration of Ka Hikitia in 2008.  

Contributions and resources

Archives New Zealand (image)
Treaty of Waitangi Sheets
Archives New Zealand – Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga

The Treaty provides a context for the relationship between the Crown, iwi, and Māori. Ensuring that Māori students enjoy and achieve educational success as Māori is a joint responsibility of the Crown (represented by the Ministry of Education and other education sector agencies and departments) and iwi, hapū, and whānau.

Source: Archives New Zealand

Archives New Zealand
Ka Hikitia and the Treaty
The Treaty of Waitangi and Ka Hikitia

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 gives expression to how the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi are applied in education.

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 emphasises the power of collaboration and the value of working closely with iwi and Māori organisations to lift the performance of the education system.

For education professionals, collaboration is about creating ways for whānau, hapū, iwi, Māori organisations and communities to contribute to what and how Māori students learn, as well as working together to provide support for Māori students’ learning.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017, page 14
Ka Hikitia and the Treaty
NZC and the Treaty
The Treaty of Waitangi and the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC)

The Treaty of Waitangi is one of eight principles stated in The New Zealand Curriculum that provide a foundation for schools’ decision making.

The Treaty of Waitangi principle puts students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.

In schools and classrooms where this principle was very evident, there were high expectations for the achievement, attendance, and behaviour of Māori students. The programme incorporated aspects of te ao Māori. Tikanga Māori was valued and promoted. There were opportunities for all students to hear and use te reo Māori. Students had opportunities to participate in kapa haka and pōwhiri.

In these schools, targets were set for Māori student achievement, and these were reported to the board and the Māori community. The school consulted its Māori community and called on their expertise to provide advice and guidance. Māori were well represented on the board. A strategic plan outlined a planned approach to raising the achievement of Māori learners. Trustees made available sufficient funding to provide for a Māori dimension across the school.

Source: The New Zealand Curriculum Principles: Foundations for Curriculum Decision-Making, July 2012, page 18
NZC and the Treaty
Tātaiako and the Treaty
The Treaty of Waitangi and Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners

The importance of the Treaty for teachers and leaders is also reinforced in the Teachers Council’s cultural competencies, articulated in Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners (2011, p. 4). This resource includes expectations of teachers in terms of the Treaty: that a registered teacher will be able to describe how the Treaty influences their practice as a teacher and that leaders will actively acknowledge, and act on, the implications of the Treaty.

Tātaiako and the Treaty

Resources and downloads

Archives New Zealand – Treaty of Waitangi

Archives New Zealand holds the archives of New Zealand government, including the Treaty of Waitangi.

Te Ara The Encyclopedia of New Zealand – Treaty of Waitangi

Te Ara has extensive information describing the Treaty of Waitangi.

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia is a strategy to guide actions that will make a significant difference for Māori students in education for these five years and beyond. We know Māori students do much better when education reflects and values their identity, language and culture. This is a central focus within Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

NZ Curriculum Update 16: Treaty of Waitangi principle

This Update focuses on The New Zealand Curriculum principle of the Treaty of Waitangi and its implications for teaching, learning, and the school curriculum.

NZC Online – Treaty of Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi is one of eight principles in The New Zealand Curriculum that provide a foundation for schools’ decision making.
The Treaty of Waitangi principle puts students at the centre of teaching and learning, asserting that they should experience a curriculum that engages and challenges them, is forward-looking and inclusive, and affirms New Zealand’s unique identity.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

This resource is about teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners and with their whānau and iwi. Designed for teachers, it will support your work to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners to ensure they enjoy educational success as Māori.

First strategy aims

The first Māori education strategy was launched in 1999.

It had three main goals:

  1. to raise the quality of mainstream education for Māori

  2. to support the growth of high-quality kaupapa Māori education

  3. to support greater Māori involvement and authority in education.

First strategy aims
First strategy outcomes

That first Māori education strategy recognised that Māori educational success was a Ministry-wide responsibility. In 2005, the strategy was republished to reaffirm the Ministry of Education’s commitment to Māori education.

It created an environment that led to a range of new initiatives, including:

  1. iwi educational partnerships

  2. professional learning and development programmes, such as Te Kotahitanga and Te Kauhua

  3. the Whakaaro Mātauranga communications campaign (Te Mana – ki te Taumata) and the appointment of more than 20 pouwhakataki (Māori community liaison officers) throughout the country

  4. additional Māori-medium schooling support initiatives, such as resource teachers of Māori

  5. student engagement initiatives.

First strategy outcomes
Māori Language Strategy 2003

The Māori Language Strategy 2003 is a 25-year strategy for te reo Māori. It draws together the different language revitalisation efforts of whānau, hapū, iwi, Māori, and government to create an overarching framework. Its aim is to have te reo Māori spoken widely by Māori in whānau and communities by 2028. In addition, it intends that all New Zealanders will appreciate the value of the Māori language to our society as a taonga guaranteed to Māori by the Treaty of Waitangi. 

The Ministry of Education is one of the lead agencies in this strategy. The education sector has a role to play in the regeneration of Māori language; it is a main artery for contributing to the government's strategy – hence te reo being/forms one of the major planks in Ka Hikitia.

The new Māori Language Strategy was released in 2014 and is featured in the following gallery.

Māori Language Strategy 2003
Hui Taumata Mātauranga IV 2005

This was the fourth national Māori education summit, where intergenerational discussion centred on what constituted “success” in education and the obstacles impacting on “Māori success”. 

Participants across three generations considered how Māori and the Crown could together make a difference in the education of future generations.

Five themes emerged from those discussions about “success”:

  1. relationships for learning

  2. enthusiasm for learning

  3. balanced outcomes for learning 

  4. preparing for the future

  5. being Māori.

Hui Taumata Mātauranga IV 2005

Resources and downloads

First Māori Education Strategy 1999

The first Māori education strategy was launched in 1999 and republished in 2005. It acknowledged that Māori educational success was a Ministry-wide responsibility and also recognised that iwi education partnerships were central to supporting greater Māori involvement and authority in education.

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The policy story continues: Ka Hikitia and beyond

This gallery considers policies and strategies that the government developed after the initial release of Ka Hikitia.  Ka Hikitia is touched upon in this gallery and covered in more detail in its own kete – Unpacking Ka Hikitia.

Contributions and resources

Managing for Success (image)
Ka Hikitia Phase 1
Ka Hikitia, Phase 1 – Managing for Success 2008–2012

This phase of Ka Hikitia focused on setting a direction for the future and on building momentum.

Source: Ministry of Education

Managing for Success
Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies (image)
TataiakoCompetencies
Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners

This resource focuses on teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners, their whānau, and their iwi. Designed for teachers, it helps them personalise learning for and with Māori learners to ensure that they enjoy educational success as Māori.

Source: Education Council

Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies
Grasp, Embrace and Realise (image)
WhakapumautiaCover
Whakapūmautia, Papakōwhaitia, Tau ana – Grasp, Embrace and Realise

Whakapūmautia, Papakōwhaitia, Tau ana – Grasp, Embrace and Realise resulted from iwi and the Ministry of Education working together because both acknowledged the need to address the achievement of Māori learners.

This model promotes the concept of shared responsibility and collaboration between the diverse layers of influence required to accelerate Māori achievement. It identified education relationships as a key focus and aims to transform relationships between iwi and the Ministry as a means of improving Mäori education outcomes. 

Source: Ministry of Education

Grasp, Embrace and Realise
Ruia
Ruia: Reviewing your school–whānau partnerships

Te arotake i ngā hononga kura–whānau

This interactive tool helps school leaders and whānau to identify the strengths and needs of their school–whānau partnerships in relation to seven areas:

  1. an overview of school-whānau partnerships

  2. the school curriculum

  3. teaching and learning at school

  4. teaching and learning at home

  5. reporting

  6. day-to-day involvement in the school community

  7. special events and occasions.

Source: Ministry of Education – Ruia

Ruia

Resources and downloads

Whakapūmautia, Papakōwhaitia, Tau ana – Grasp, Embrace and Realise

This book is about teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners and their whānau and iwi. Designed for teachers, it will support your work to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners, to ensure that they enjoy educational success as Māori.

Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners

This resource is about teachers’ relationships and engagement with Māori learners and with their whānau and iwi. Designed for teachers, it will support your work to personalise learning for, and with, Māori learners to ensure they enjoy educational success as Māori.

Ruia – Reviewing your school–whānau partnerships

This interactive tool is part of the Ruia School–Whānau Partnership resource. It will help school leaders to examine their partnerships with whānau.

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012

This phase of Ka Hikitia was about changing and transforming the education system to ensure that all students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge they need to realise their potential and succeed.

Accelerating Success (image)
KaHikitiaAcceleratingSuccessEnglish 1
Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 is the Government’s strategy to rapidly change how education performs. It intends that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications, and knowledge they need to succeed and to be proud in knowing who they are as Māori.

Source: Ministry of Education

Accelerating Success
Tatai Pou
Tatai Pou

An internal Ministry of Education initiative in response to the Auditor General’s report (2013) on the implementation of Ka Hikitia.  As a result, Ministry staff are now expected to meet cultural competencies in order to bring about an attitudinal shift and help them put Ka Hikitia into effect.

Tatai Pou
Tau Mai Te Reo (image)
TauMaiTeReoFullStrategy English 1
Tau Mai Te Reo – The Māori Language in Education Strategy 2013–2017

Tau Mai Te Reo expresses what the Ministry of Education and education sector agencies will do for learners of Māori language in education. This includes Māori-medium education and Māori language in English-medium settings.

Source: Ministry of Education

Tau Mai Te Reo
Ka Hikitia in Action (image)
KaHikitiaInActionOct2014 1
Ka Hikitia in Action

Ka Hikitia in Action is a series of publications that showcase the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn. They illustrate that Māori educational success can be achieved when communities, iwi, schools, early learning centres, and  the Ministry work in collaboration – mahi tahi.

Source: Ministry of Education

Ka Hikitia in Action
The Māori Language Bill
The Māori Language Bill 2016

Currently before parliament, this bill just passed its second reading.

The Bill affirms the status of the Māori language as:

  1. the indigenous language of New Zealand

  2. a taonga of iwi and Māori

  3. a language valued by the nation

  4. an official language of New Zealand.

Source: Te Puni Kōreri

The Māori Language Bill

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia is a strategy to guide actions that will make a significant difference for Māori students in education for these five years and beyond. We know Māori students do much better when education reflects and values their identity, language and culture. This is a central focus within Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

Ka Hikitia in Action web page

The Ka Hikitia in Action web page offers real-life examples of what the Māori education strategy Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 looks like when communities take the lead and turn a government strategy into community action.

Ka Hikitia in Action, Issue 1

Ka Hikitia in Action showcases the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn. It illustrates that Māori educational success can be achieved when communities, iwi, schools, early learning centres, and the Ministry work in collaboration – mahi tahi.

Ka Hikitia in Action, Issue 2

Ka Hikitia in Action gives real-life examples of what Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 looks like when communities take the lead and turn a government strategy into community action.

The Māori Language Bill 2016

Currently before parliament, this bill just passed its second reading. It aims to affirm the importance of the Māori Language.

Tau Mai Te Reo – The Māori Language in Education Strategy 2013–2017

Tau Mai Te Reo expresses what the Ministry of Education and education sector agencies will do for learners of Māori language in education. “Māori language in education” includes Māori-medium education and Māori language in English-medium settings.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.