Welcome to Building on Success.


Towards educational success for Māori – the research story

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/towards-educational-success-for-maori-the-research-story/

This kete looks at some of the guidelines and research that is informing the policies, strategies, and responses being developed to support Māori learners enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori.

Categories

Part of
Crown leadership

Unpacking the Better Public Services guidelines

This gallery provides a view of the driving forces that are now helping to set government and education sector priorities. 

Contributions and resources

Better Public Services targets

In his March 2012 speech, Prime Minister John Key outlined the government’s priority to deliver better public services to New Zealanders within tight financial constraints.

Ten targets were set within five key areas as part of this initiative:

  1. Reducing long-term welfare dependency

    • Reduce the number of people who have been on a working age benefit for more than 12 months.
  2. Supporting vulnerable children

    • Increase participation in early childhood education.
    • Increase infant immunisation rates and reduce the incidence of rheumatic fever.
    • Reduce the number of assaults on children.
  3. Boosting skills and employment

    • Increase the proportion of 18-year-olds with NCEA level 2 or equivalent qualification.
    • Increase the proportion of 25- to 34-year olds with advanced trade qualifications, diplomas, and degrees (at level 4 or above).
  4. Reducing crime

    • Reduce the rates of total crime, violent crime, and youth crime.
    • Reduce reoffending.
  5. Improving interaction with government 

    • New Zealand businesses have a one-stop online shop for all the government advice and support they need to run and grow their businesses.
    • New Zealanders can complete their transactions with the government easily in a digital environment.

Source: Better Public Services Results Targets

Better Public Services targets
MoE Statement of Intent – targets (image)
MoEBPSTargets 15
Ministry of Education Statement of Intent 2014–2018

This document is the Ministry of Education's response to the targets outlined in the Better Public Services guidelines. Its targets were that 98% of children who start school in 2016 will have participated in early childhood education and that 85% of 18-year-olds will have achieved NCEA Level 2 or equivalent in 2017.  The MoE added an additional target that 85% of primary school students would be meeting national standards in 2017.  

Source: Ministry of Education – Statement of Intent 2014

MoE Statement of Intent – targets
MoE Statement of Intent – initial data (image)
EdCountsBPS Tracking
Ministry of Education Statement of Intent 2014–2018

From 2013 to 2014, Māori saw the highest percentage increase in the proportion of 18-year-olds who attained the equivalent of NCEA Level 2 or above. All other ethnic groups also had increases in achievement rates from 2013 to 2014. In addition, all ethnic groups showed an accelerated increase in achievement rates from 2013 to 2014 compared with the 2012 to 2013 increase.

Source: Education Counts – Education and learning outcomes

MoE Statement of Intent – initial data

Resources and downloads

Better Public Services Results Targets

This 2012 document outlines the government's priority to deliver better public services within tight fiscal constraints. Ten targets were set in five key areas: reducing long-term welfare dependency, supporting vulnerable children, boosting skills and employment, reducing crime, and improving interaction with government.

Ministry of Education Statement of Intent

In this document, the Ministry responded to the Better Public Services targets set for it by the government in 2012. These were that 98% of children who start school in 2016 will have participated in early childhood education and that 85% of 18-year-olds will have achieved NCEA Level 2 or equivalent in 2017.
The Ministry added an additional target of 85% of primary school students meeting national standards in 2017.

Education Counts – Demographic data

When considering progress and achievement in the education sector, this section of the Education Counts website offers a set of filters that visitors can use to view information and data that matches their needs.
The online filters include, for example, ethnic group, gender, decile, region, and international.

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Considering the key evidence in system inquiry

This gallery considers how evidence of impact, at a system level, has driven the need to improve values outcomes for Māori learners.

The impetus and urgency for improvement has been driven by outcomes and achievement data. As we began to devise the assessment tools and measures, the urgency became clearer for educators and the gaps between Māori and non-Māori more graphically demonstrated.

Contributions and resources

PISA 2012 (image)
PISA2012MaoriProficiency
The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) New Zealand Summary 2012

This summary report provided an overview of New Zealand results for mathematics, reading, and science in an international context. In addition, this report looked at the overall trends in New Zealand achievement for each of these subjects as well as for priority learners (Māori, Pasifika, and students from low socio-economic backgrounds).

Figures 6.4 to 6.6 show that Māori students are represented at all proficiency levels.

Source: Education Counts

PISA 2012
NMSSA 2013 (image)
Maths Ed Gazette 2015 2
National Monitoring Study of Student Achievement 2013

The National Monitoring Study of Student Achievement has been in operation since 2012, building on the strengths of the National Education Monitoring Project (NEMP). An early contributor to New Zealand’s research knowledge, NEMP was established in 1995 to capture a broad picture of the achievements of representative samples of New Zealand school students at successive points.

NMSSA 2013
NCEA data and statistics (image)
Level2attainmentEthnicity
Annual Report on NCEA and New Zealand Scholarship Data and Statistics (2014)

This report provides information about secondary-school qualifications administered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). Its primary focus is the main New Zealand secondary school suite of qualifications, the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) at Levels 1, 2, and 3.

Source: Annual Report on NCEA and New Zealand Scholarship Data and Statistics (2014)

NCEA data and statistics
National Standards data (image)
NationalStandardAchievementbyEthnicity
National Standards results 2014: Reading, Mathematics, and Writing

Overall, this data shows that there are pressing issues of inequality. While there are particular challenges and successes for each group, overall achievement for Māori and Pasifika across the three standards is much lower than for Asian and European Pākehā – roughly 10% to 20% points worse. With regards to gender, girls’ achievement is much higher than boys (except in mathematics).

Source: Education Counts – National Standards

National Standards data

Resources and downloads

PISA 2012 – New Zealand Summary Report

This summary report provides an overview of New Zealand results for mathematics, reading, and science in an international context. In addition, the report looks at the overall trends in New Zealand achievement for each of these subjects and for priority learners (Māori, Pasifika, and low socio-economic students).

National Monitoring Study of Student Achievement

NMSSA continues the work of the National Education Monitoring Project (NEMP), which was an early contributor to New Zealand’s research knowledge. NMSSA was established in 2012 to capture a broad picture of the achievements of representative samples of New Zealand school students at successive points in time.

National Standards Results, 2014: Reading, Maths, and Writing

Overall, the data from 2014 showed that there were pressing issues of inequality. Whilst there were particular challenges and successes for each group, overall, achievement for Māori and Pasifika across the three standards was much lower than for Asian and European/Pākehā – roughly 10% to 20% points worse. With regards to gender, girls’ achievement was much higher than boys (except in maths).

What is BES?
BES (Iterative Best Evidence Synthesis) Programme – What Works Evidence – Hei Kete Raukura

BES is a collaborative knowledge-building strategy, designed to strengthen the evidence base that informs education policy and practice in New Zealand.

The programme provides trustworthy evidence about what works and what makes a bigger difference in education. The touchstone of the programme is its focus on explaining and optimising influences on valued outcomes for diverse (all) learners. The BES series is designed to be a catalyst for systemic and ongoing improvement in education.

Source: Education Counts

What is BES?
BESs

The main outputs of the Iterative BES Programme are Best Evidence Synthesis Iterations (BESs). BES Cases from recent syntheses are user-friendly resources to support focused professional learning.

  1. School Leadership and Student Outcomes Best Evidence Synthesis
    by V. Robinson, M. Hohepa, and C. Lloyd

  2. Effective Pedagogy in the Social Sciences/Tikanga ā iwi Best Evidence Synthesis
    by G. Aitken and C. Sinnema

  3. Teacher Professional Learning and Development Best Evidence Synthesis
    by H. Timperley et al.

  4. Effective Pedagogy in Mathematics/ Pāngarau Best Evidence Synthesis
    by G. Anthony and M. Walshaw

Source: Education Counts

BESs
Other BESs

Some more Best Evidence Synthesis Iterations (BESs). 

  1. Professional Development in Early Childhood Settings
    by L. Mitchell and P. Cubey

  2. Community and Family Influences on Children's Achievement in New Zealand
    by F. J. and C. Biddulph

  3. Quality Teaching: Early Foundations
    by S. Farquhar

  4. Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling
    by A. Alton-Lee

Source: Education Counts

Other BESs
BES Exemplars

The BES exemplars are a series of publications that make transparent the nature of:

  • highly effective teaching
  • professional learning and development
  • educational leadership
  • educationally powerful connections with families/whānau
  • communities that support such teaching.

They were created in response to requests from New Zealand teachers and principals for real-life examples. Wherever possible, the exemplars are derived from research and development carried out in New Zealand schools and kura.

  1. BES Exemplar 1 – Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira 1 
    Developing communities of mathematical inquiry [PDF 3.8MB]

    Accelerate achievement and counter bullying through effective mathematics teaching.

  2. BES Exemplar 2 – Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira 2
    Ripiene Āwhina ki te Pānui Pukapuka (RĀPP)  [PDF 6.4MB]

    Accelerate reading and comprehension achievement in te reo Māori.

  3. BES Exemplar 3 – Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira 3
    Teacher and student use of learning goals  [PDF 4.0MB]

    Improve teaching, decrease student misbehaviour, and accelerate achievement through the effective use of goals and feedback in writing (and across the curriculum).

  4. BES Exemplar 4 – Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira 4
    Reciprocal teaching  [PDF 4.7MB]

    Develop student leadership and accelerate literacy achievement across the curriculum.  This exemplar provides examples at primary, intermediate, and secondary levels.

  5. BES Exemplar 5 – Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira 5
    Learning logs - He kete wherawhera [PDF 1.6MB]

    Strengthen teacher–student communication and accelerate achievement through the use of learning logs. This exemplar focuses on NCEA Level 1 but is relevant across schooling. 

Source: Education Counts

BES Exemplars

Resources and downloads

Best Evidence Synthesis home page (Education Counts)

In the Best Evidence Synthesis section of the Education Counts website, you will find all the latest downloads of the BES Iterations, the BES summaries, exemplars, and related resources.

ERO evaluation indicators (image)
ERO6Domains
Description

Educationally powerful connections and relationships is one of the six core domains that the ERO identifies as an important influence on student outcomes.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators (2015)

ERO evaluation indicators
Engage and involve
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 1: Learning-centred relationships effectively engage and involve the school community.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Parents, families, whānau, and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning.

  2. A strengths-based approach recognises and affirms the diverse identities, languages, and cultures of parents, families, whānau, and the community and proactively brokers engagement and participation.

  3. Parents, families, whānau, and the community participate in school activities and decision making in a variety of productive roles.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Engage and involve
Reciprocal learning relationships
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 2: Communication supports and strengthens reciprocal, learning-centred relationships.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. A range of appropriate and effective communication strategies are used to communicate with and engage parents, families, whānau, and community.

  2. Students, parents and families, whānau, and teachers have shared understandings about curriculum goals and the processes of teaching and learning, and engage in productive learning conversations.

  3. Students, parents, families, whānau, and teachers work together to identify student strengths and learning needs and to set goals and plan responsive learning strategies and activities.

  4. Students, parents, families, whānau, and teachers understand the full range of pathways, programmes, options, and supports that are available and participate in informed decision making at critical transition points.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Reciprocal learning relationships
Provision of learning opportunities
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 3: Student learning at home is actively promoted through the provision of relevant learning opportunities, resources, and support.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Parents, families, and whānau receive information and participate in individual and group learning opportunities that enable them to support and promote their children’s learning.

  2. Any homework that is assigned is carefully designed to promote purposeful interactions between parents and children, and teachers provide timely, descriptive oral or written feedback.

  3. Parents, families, and whānau are enabled to support their children’s learning through the provision of materials and the creation of connections with community resources.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Provision of learning opportunities
Community and collaboration
ERO evaluation indicators of educationally powerful connections and relationships

Evaluation indicator 4: Community collaboration and partnerships extend and enrich opportunities for students to become confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners.  

This is reflected in the following effective practices:

  1. Teachers and parents, family, whānau, and community engage in joint activities and interventions to improve learning and/or behaviour.

  2. The school and the community work together to support students in making effective transitions at critical points in their education pathway.

  3. The school proactively identifies and draws on community resources and expertise to improve learning opportunities and capacity to improve student achievement and well-being.

Source: ERO School Evaluation Indicators

Community and collaboration

Resources and downloads

ERO School Evaluation Indicators 2015

This is the complete School Evaluation Indicators 2015 pdf document. New effective practice indicators have been developed by working with expert advisers and drawing on the best evidence of what really works to achieve equity and excellence.

ERO School Evaluation Indicators – Outcome indicators

This pdf document summarises the evalutation indicators and effective practices across the six domains identified by the ERO as effective in raising student achievement.

ERO Framework for School Reviews – Self-review

The Framework for School Reviews is about the process the Education Review Office (ERO) uses when reviewing state primary and secondary schools. It includes strategies to assist the self-review process.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.