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Unpacking Ka Hikitia

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/unpacking-ka-hikitia/

The earliest Māori Education Strategy was developed in 1999. Since that time, the Ministry’s policy has continued to be informed by a range of responses. 

This kete looks at the latest version of the Māori Education Strategy, Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017, and unpacks some of its key components.

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Crown leadership

What is Ka Hikitia?

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 follows on from its predecessor, Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012. “Ka Hikitia” means to step up, to lift up, or to lengthen one’s stride. In this context, it means stepping up how the education system performs to ensure that Māori students are enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori.

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Contributions and resources

Ka Hikitia

“Ka Hikitia” means to step up, to lift up, or to lengthen one’s stride. It means stepping up how the education system performs to ensure that Māori students are enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori.

Ka hikitia! Ka hikitia!

Hiki, hikitia!

Whakarewa ki runga rawa

Herea kia kore e hoki whakamuri mai

Poua atu Te Pūmanawa Māori

He Mana Tikanga

Me Te Uri o Māia

Poipoia ngā mokopuna

Ngā rangatira mo āpōpō

Ka tihei! Tihei mauriora!

 

Ka hikitia! Ka hikitia!

Encourage and support!

And raise it to its highest level

Ensure that high achievement is maintained

Hold fast to our Māori potential

Our cultural advantage

And our inherent capability

Nurture our young generation

The leaders of the future

Behold, we move onwards and upwards! 

Ka Hikitia
Managing for Success (image)
Ka Hikitia Phase 1
Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012

Managing for Success 2008–2012 determined the principles, priorities, and foundations that form the basis for the current and future phases of the Ka Hikitia strategy.

Source: Ministry of Education

Managing for Success
Accelerating Success (image)
Ka Hikitia Phase 2
Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Accelerating Success 2013–2017 is the Government’s strategy to rapidly change how education performs. It intends that all Māori students gain the skills, qualifications, and knowledge they need to succeed and to be proud in knowing who they are as Māori.

Source: Ministry of Education

Accelerating Success
Going beyond (image)
Ka Hikitia Phase 3
Ka Hikitia Phase 3 – 2018–2022

An ongoing focus on Māori realising educational success as Māori.

Source: Ministry of Education

Going beyond
Strategy overview (image)
KHVisionPrinciples
Strategy overview of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success strategy overview identifies the guiding principles and critical factors required to achieve the vision of Māori enjoying and achieving educational success as Māori.

Source: Ministry of Education

Strategy overview

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Ka Hikitia is a strategy to guide actions that will make a significant difference for Māori students in education for these five years and beyond. We know Māori students do much better when education reflects and values their identity, language and culture. This is a central focus within Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017.

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012

This phase of Ka Hikitia was about changing and transforming the education system to ensure that all students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge they need to realise their potential and succeed.

Treaty of Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi is a key part of the foundation for decision making within The New Zealand Curriculum:

The curriculum acknowledges the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and the bicultural foundations of Aotearoa New Zealand. All students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge of te reo Māori me ōna tikanga.

Source: The New Zealand Curriculum, page 9
Treaty of Waitangi
Māori potential approach (image)
KHMaoriPotentialApproach
Description

Every Māori student has the potential to make a valuable social, cultural, and economic contribution to the well-being of their whānau, hapū, iwi, and community and to New Zealand as a whole. 

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Māori potential approach
Ako
Ako – a two-way teaching and learning process

Quality teaching is the most important influence that the education system can have on student achievement.

Effective teaching and learning depends on the relationship between the teacher and student and the teacher’s ability to engage and motivate the students.

Ako describes a teaching and learning relationship where the educator is also learning from the student and where educators’ practices are informed by the latest research and are both deliberate and reflective. Ako is grounded in the principle of reciprocity and also recognises that the learner and whānau cannot be separated.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017, page 16
Ako
Identity, language, and culture
Identity, language, and culture count

An education system incorporating identity, language, and culture values knowing where students come from and building on what students bring with them. The resources you will find on this page reflect the value of identity, language, and culture and provide examples of this in the classroom and beyond.

Māori children and students are more likely to achieve when they see themselves, their whānau, hapū, and iwi reflected in the teaching content and environment, and are able to be ‘Māori’ in all learning contexts.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017
Identity, language, and culture
Productive partnerships
Productive partnerships

Productive partnerships incorporate Māori students, whānau, and educators in sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better outcomes for Māori learners. This principle includes taking a “personalised learning” approach that puts every learner and their achievement at the heart of education and recognises that one size fits one.

Increasing whānau and iwi authority and involvement in education is critical to improving presence, engagement, and achievement. To achieve this, parents and whānau must be actively involved in decision-making and their children’s learning in all education settings.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017
Productive partnerships

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012

This phase of Ka Hikitia was about changing and transforming the education system to ensure that all students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge they need to realise their potential and succeed.

New Zealand Curriculum Online

This website offers information and resources related to the curriculum. This also includes news, advice, and guidance, inspiring school stories, practical ideas, research reports, how to get support, and much more.

Critical factors for success (image)
KHCriticalFactors
The two essential factors for success

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 focuses on driving the importance of two critical factors in the education system: quality provision and strong engagement. Evidence shows that improvement in these two areas will make the most powerful difference to Māori students’ educational success.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Critical factors for success
Quality provision

Quality provision, leadership, teaching and learning, supported by effective governance, have a direct influence on student engagement and achievement. In an education context, high-quality teaching makes the biggest difference to student outcomes. This acknowledges that parents, whānau, and iwi may also play a role within the education system as volunteers, board members, education professionals and through the design and delivery of professional learning and development.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017, page 23
Quality provision
Strong engagement

Strong engagement and contribution from students and those who are best placed to support them – parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, Māori organisations, communities and businesses – have a strong influence on students’ success. Māori students’ learning is strengthened when education professionals include a role for parents and whānau, hapū, iwi, and Māori organisations and communities in curriculum, teaching and learning.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017, page 23
Strong engagement
Focus areas (image)
KHFocusAreas
Five focus areas of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

The Ka Hikitia strategy applies the two critical factors of quality provision and strong engagement to each of these five focus areas.

Source: Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Focus areas

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success 2008–2012

This phase of Ka Hikitia was about changing and transforming the education system to ensure that all students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge they need to realise their potential and succeed.

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Ka Hikitia in Action and case studies

This gallery focuses on the Ka Hikitia in Action publications series and video case studies and the Rangiātea case studies and exemplars.  All these resources are available in the Ka Hikitia section of the Ministry’s education.govt.nz website.

These exemplars and case studies focus on schools that have accepted the challenge of delivering an education that accelerates success for their Māori students. They have opened their doors to share their practice.  

Ka Hikitia in Action showcases the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn.

Contributions and resources

Ka Hikitia in Action

Ka Hikitia in Action showcases the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn. It illustrates that Māori educational success can be achieved when communities, iwi, schools, early learning centres, and the Ministry work in collaboration – mahi tahi.

I hope Ka Hikitia in Action gives you the information you’ve been looking for. Please share it with your families, the people at work, your sports club, at the marae – wherever you go. These are real, practical stories of how people like you are putting the Māori education strategy Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 into action.

Peter Hughes, Secretary for Education (Oct 2014) ; Source:

Source: Ministry of Education – Ka Hikitia in Action

Ka Hikitia in Action
Issue 1 (image)
KHIAvolume1
Ka Hikitia in Action – Issue 1

This issue has a range of stories showing the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn.

Source: Ka Hikitia in Action – Issue 1

Issue 1
Issue 2 (image)
KHIAvolume2
Ka Hikitia in Action – Issue 2

This issue has a range of stories showing the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn.

Source: Ka Hikitia In Action – Issue 2

Issue 2
Rangiātea case studies

The Rangiātea case studies and exemplars examine five secondary schools, each of which is on a journey towards realising Māori student potential.

The resources consist of downloadable PDF files with summaries and reflective questions that will support leadership teams in discussion and reflection.

  1. Hamilton Girls’ High School: This exemplar explores how Hamilton Girls’ High School, working collaboratively with whānau and Māori students, built powerful educational relationships by using whānau tutor classes, vertical tutor classes, and mentoring.

  2. Hastings Boys’ High School: This exemplar explores Hastings Boys’ High School’s use of Pastoral, Academic, Careers and Education (PACE). This is a school-wide programme to help students make choices about school courses and to be better prepared for leaving school.

  3. Kakapo College: This exemplar tells how Kakapo College built relationships and modified the curriculum in order to engage the interest of Māori boys in the learning area of English.

  4. Opotiki College: This exemplar explores Opotiki College’s restorative justice approach to behaviour management and its impact on student achievement.

  5. Western Springs College: The Western Springs College exemplar focuses on mathematics. For a number of years, students have achieved high levels of success in this area. This has resulted from a programme of continuous, individualised monitoring of achievement in terms of both student progress and teaching effectiveness.

Source: Educational Leaders website

Rangiātea case studies

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia in Action web page

The Ka Hikitia in Action web page offers real-life examples of what the Māori education strategy Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 looks like when communities take the lead and turn a government strategy into community action.

Ka Hikitia in Action, Issue 1

Ka Hikitia in Action showcases the critical role that parents, whānau, and communities play in helping their children to learn. It illustrates that Māori educational success can be achieved when communities, iwi, schools, early learning centres, and the Ministry work in collaboration – mahi tahi.

Ka Hikitia in Action, Issue 2

Ka Hikitia in Action gives real-life examples of what Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017 looks like when communities take the lead and turn a government strategy into community action.

Rangiātea case studies

These Rangiātea case studies and exemplars examine five secondary schools. They look at the strategies used by school leadership teams and report on the key factors that are contributing towards lifting Māori student achievement in their schools.
The resources consist of downloadable PDF files with summaries and reflective questions that will support leadership teams in discussion and reflection.

Newton Central School (video)
A culture of trust and relationships

The first in a series of seven videos from Newton Central discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Newton Central School
Porangahau School (video)
Productive partnerships

The first in a series of nine videos from Porangahau School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Porangahau School
Breens Intermediate (video)
Belonging and being bold, brilliant, brave, and beautiful

The first in a series of four videos from Breens Intermediate School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Breens Intermediate
Te Karaka Area School (video)
Living the Treaty of Waitangi

The first in a series of seven videos from Te Karaka Area School discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Te Karaka Area School
Makoura College (video)
Mana Māori

The first in a series of five videos from Makoura College discussing how the core principles of Ka Hikitia have been implemented in their school. 

See the full set of videos with focus questions here

Closed captioning available in player

Source: Ministry of Education

Makoura College

Resources and downloads

Ka Hikitia case studies

This series of case studies tells the stories of five schools that have engaged in making a difference for their Māori students. It includes 32 videos, key focus points, and questions. The case studies are intended as a conversation starter for teachers, whānau, boards of trustees, principals and parents.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.