Welcome to Building on Success.


Valuing identity, language and culture

http://maori-ed.tki.org.nz/what-works-for-maori-learners-and-why/valuing-identity-language-and-culture/

There is a strong link between well-being and achievement. Students’ well-being is strongly influenced by a clear sense of identity, and access and exposure to their own language and culture. Students do better in education when what and how they learn reflects and positively reinforces where they come from, what they value and what they already know.”

-  Ka Hikitia Accelerating Success 2013-2017, page 16.

 

Normalising te reo Māori

The Māori Language Strategy urges teachers to value and use te reo Māori as a normal part of their teaching. This gallery presents resources that could support teachers to do this.

Students’ well-being is strongly influenced by a clear sense of identity, and access and exposure to their own language and culture.

Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013–2017

Contributions and resources

Māori Language Strategy 2014 (image)
tpk maorireostrategy 2014 1
Description

In May 2014, Cabinet approved the Government’s new Māori Language Strategy. This booklet provides a summary of the key elements of the Māori Language Strategy 2014.

Source: Te Puni Kōkiri

Māori Language Strategy 2014
He Reo Ora

The extensive and visually rich multimedia resource He Reo Tupu, He Reo Ora was developed in 2010. It assists teachers to plan and deliver a Māori language programme in an English-medium primary school classroom setting.

In this site you will find the following resources:

  1. teacher’s notes – outlining how and why to use these resources

  2. unit plans

  3. resource sheets – to support the unit plans

  4. videos – guiding the use of the resources and demonstrating how they look in the classroom

  5. reomations” – a set of animations to be used in the classroom to support each unit plan.

Source: He Reo Tupu, He Reo Ora

He Reo Ora
Ka Mau te Wehi!

Ka Mau te Wehi! was produced in 2007. The title means “awesome!” or “fantastic!” – adopted to acknowledge and celebrate all achievements, large or small, made by the teacher and learner as they learn te reo Māori together.

Ka Mau te Wehi! was developed for English-medium schools, based on levels 1 and 2 of the then draft Te Reo Māori in the New Zealand Curriculum. It features a video collection and written materials providing 20 units of work, each having a distinct theme and providing fun opportunities to learn and practise new language.  

Ka Mau te Wehi!
Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi

Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi is available on TKI and is described as a storehouse of resources for teachers. It  is designed to be effective in promoting language learning and to support Te Aho Arataki Marau mō te Ako i Te Reo Māori – Kura Auraki – Curriculum Guidelines for Teaching and Learning Te Reo Māori in English-medium Schools: Years 1–13.  

While developed to support the teaching of te reo Māori, these resources may also be useful for teachers to update their own language capabilities. The site offers:

  1. high-frequency vocabulary lists – 1000 keywords

  2. unit plans

  3. examples of learner and teacher assessment checklists

  4. examples of learner goal setting

  5. examples of learner strategies

  6. a bibliography of accessible articles and books on language teaching

  7. a grammar progression outline with references to further information

  8. language learning task types and sample tasks in Māori.

Source: Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi

Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi
Reo Māori Resources

This page on TKI gives a visual presentation and links to a range of resources that support the teaching and learning of te reo Māori.  Teachers will find these valuable when considering ways in which they might introduce te reo Māori into their teaching practice.

Reo Māori Resources

Resources and downloads

The Māori Language Strategy

This booklet provides a summary of the key elements of the Government’s Māori Language Strategy 2014, which was approved by Cabinet in May of that year.

He Reo Tupu, He Reo Ora

The extensive multimedia resource He Reo Tupu, He Reo Ora was developed in 2010 to assist teachers to plan and deliver a Māori language programme in an English-medium primary school classroom setting.
It comprises a web presence and materials on TKI and an accompanying DVD. One of its goals is also to support teachers to build their capability and confidence to teach the language. Content includes engaging animations (“reomations”) featuring entry level words, phrases, and concepts, together with teachers’ notes (8 modules), resources, vocabulary (including classroom language), and suggested activities.

Ka Mau te Wehi!

Ka Mau te Wehi! was developed in 2007 for English-medium schools, based on levels 1 and 2 of the then draft Te Reo Māori in the New Zealand Curriculum. It features a video collection and written materials providing 20 units of work, each having a distinct theme and providing fun opportunities to learn and practise new language.

Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi

Available on TKI, Te Whakaipurangi Rauemi is a storehouse of resources for teachers to promote language learning and to support Te Aho Arataki Marau mō te Ako i Te Reo Māori – Kura Auraki, the currriculum guidelines for teaching te reo Māori in English-medium schools.
While developed to support the teaching of te reo Māori, the useful resources may be useful to teachers in updating their own language capabilities.

Reo Māori resources

This page on TKI provides a visual presentation and links to a range of resources that support the teaching and learning of te reo Māori. Teachers will find these of value when considering ways in which they might introduce te reo Māori into their teaching practice.

Te Hiringa i te Mahara

From 1998 to 2008, Gardiner & Parata Ltd successfully managed Te Hiringa i te Mahara (THM) as part of the Māori Secondary Teachers’ Workload programme. 

Over that time, many THM resources were produced to support teachers.  These included downloadable, adaptable thematic resources for use in English- and Māori-medium settings.  Themes include:

  1. careers

  2. management

  3. mathematics

  4. science

  5. social studies

  6. te reo Māori

  7. technology

  8. miscellaneous

Source: Te Hiringa i te Mahara resource archive

Te Hiringa i te Mahara
Tōku Reo

Tōku Reo is a language-learning television series, broadcast on Māori Television and available online. It combines kaumātua, rangatahi, learners, and native speakers in the context of a beginners’ learning programme to present a full Māori learning experience – “a vibrant way of learning Te Reo Māori in the comfort of your own home”.

The series is based on the comprehensive Te Whanake language course created by Professor John Moorfield. Every block of five episodes presents vocabulary centred around a role-play as well as a small number of sentence structures. Segments on newly coined words from the Māori Language Commission, different tribal dialect, and “homework” complete the complement of learning support.

  1. Series 1

  2. Series 2

  3. Series 3

  4. Series 4

  5. Series 5

Source: Tōku Reo

Tōku Reo

Resources and downloads

Te Hiringa i te Mahara

From 1998 to 2008, many Te Hiringa i te Mahara (THM) resources were produced to support teachers as part of the Māori Secondary Teachers’ Workload programme. These include downloadable, adaptable thematic resources for use in English- and Māori-medium settings.

Tōku Reo on Māori Television

Tōku Reo is a language-learning television series broadcast on Māori Television and available online. It combines kaumātua, rangatahi, learners, and native speakers in the context of a beginners’ learning programme to present a full Māori learning experience.

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Social Sciences – collections with a Māori perspective

This gallery features resources that could support social sciences teaching and learning.

Contributions and resources

Hītori Māori – Māori history

Hītori Māori

This website is available on TKI.  It was designed to give teachers access to materials that assist in the implementation of Te Takanga o te Wā: Teaching Guidelines for Years 1–4.

Teaching Māori history effectively relies heavily on the co-construction of learning with students. As teachers, we need to involve the community and be mindful of the background knowledge of students, their whānau, and iwi. Utilising these resources gives all students a personalised knowledge base, encourages working collaboratively with whānau and local iwi, and enhances the status of diverse learners in the classroom community.

Source: Māori history website
Hītori Māori – Māori history
Waitangi 175

The Waitangi 175 website on TKI was developed for schools and organisations to share what they were doing to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

Its content includes useful links to a range of teaching resources in English and te reo Māori.  Schools were also able to submit their own work using the upload form.

Waitangi 175
Kia Mau

Kia Mau is available on the Ministry’s TKI site in both English and te reo Māori.

With two waiata and two haka as its inspiration, the site explores a number of themes associated with social sciences – including customs and traditions, social justice, leadership, bereavement, and spirituality. Although the resource is primarily written for social sciences, there are obvious links with the arts, for example, dance.

The teachers’ notes are designed to be used in conjunction with the Kia Mau video clips. These contain short documentaries on each waiata and haka, looking at how people’s actions have brought about social change in New Zealand history. The notes and the video clips can be used as a springboard for students to look at how past events, and different individuals and communities, have shaped New Zealand identity and culture.

Kia Mau
Te Ara

Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand is a comprehensive guide to our peoples, natural environment, history, culture, economy, and society.

Te Ara provides text, images, and media relating to the following content areas:

  1. Māori New Zealanders is a section of Te Ara with resources that focus on two key areas:

    1. Iwi – which provides an account of the stories of a number of iwi from around Aotearoa
    2. Māori origins and arrivals – which provides an account of Pacific migrations, navigation and canoe tradition, as well as some Māori origin stories.
  2. Story: Māori is a brief overview of the Māori story in Aotearoa in six sections:

    1. People and culture today
    2. Pre-European society
    3. The arrival of Europeans
    4. Decline and revival
    5. Urbanisation and renaissance
    6. External links and sources
Te Ara
Living Heritage

The Living Heritage collection provides the tools and online space for students to share their local stories. 

An online bilingual initiative, it supports students to become investigators and storytellers, collaborating with each other to research, write, and publish on the Web. Students can identify a unique and important piece of local heritage to share on the site – and contributions include stories about local people, families and whānau, events, landmarks, materials, marae, and buildings. Relevant examples include:

  1. Koru Pa: Thirteen students from years 5 and 6 at Central School, New Plymouth present their website about the history of Koru Pa at Oakura.

  2. The Mahana Whakapapa: Each class at Mahana School made an in-depth study of historical aspects of Mahana life. They used what they learned to produce a historical production for their school community.

  3. Ngā Poupou (Paparore School’s poupou): In 2005, this school commissioned a kaiwhakairo to carve the school’s poupou. This represented part of the history of the area, the place, the people, the kura, and some aspects of learning they thought were important. In term 1 and 2 of 2010, the class topic was Our Place, Our Stories, and the poupou was used as a way of sharing this with others.

Living Heritage

Resources and downloads

Māori history on TKI

This site was designed to give teachers access to materials to assist in the implementation of Te Takanga o te Wā, Guidelines for Teachers Years 1–8.

Waitangi 175

The Waitangi 175 website was developed for schools and organisations to share what they were doing to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Its content includes useful links to a range of teaching resources in English and te reo Māori.

Kia Mau

Kia Mau is available on the Ministry’s TKI site in both English and te reo Māori.
With two waiata and two haka as inspiration, the site explores a number of themes associated with social sciences – including customs and traditions, social justice, leadership, bereavement, and spirituality. Although the resource is primarily written for social sciences, there are obvious links with the arts, for example, dance.

Te Ara The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

This site provides a comprehensive guide to New Zealand’s peoples, natural environment, history, culture, and economy.

New Zealand History

This site features information and resources from within the History Group of the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Three broad categories showcase themes in New Zealand history: culture and society, politics and government, war and society.

The National Library of New Zealand

As well as its services to schools, the website of the National Library of New Zealand includes a range of online collections. A search on “Māori” produces a large volume of content.

The Living Heritage

The Living Heritage collection is an online bilingual initiative. It was developed to support an authentic learning experience by encouraging students to become investigators and storytellers, collaborating with each other to research, write, and publish on the Web. Contributions include stories about local people, families and whānau, events, landmarks, materials, marae and buildings.

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Websites and resources to support different learning areas

This gallery features websites and resources to support different learning areas.

Contributions and resources

Ako Panuku

The Ministry’s Ako Panuku web presence was developed to support and build on the expertise and professionalism of Māori teachers. 

Ako Panuku values Māori teachers’ contribution to improving outcomes for students. It aims to support them to enhance their professionalism and acknowledge the critical contribution they make to education and to the achievement of Māori students.

The English-medium resources section of the site contains a range of downloadable, New Zealand Curriculum-aligned resources with a Māori perspective or connection. They are intended for use by English-medium schools. The learning areas covered are:

  1. te reo Māori

  2. science

  3. PE and health

  4. mathematics

  5. social studies

  6. English

  7. the arts

  8. technology.

Ako Panuku
Living World Rocky Shore

This level 4–5 Living World resource on the topic of the Rocky Shore is available on the Ministry’s Science Online community on TKI. 

It has a particular focus on how traditional Māori knowledge and science knowledge can work together in the preservation and resource management of green-lipped mussels.  Within this context, it asks the question “What is the same and what is different about these two types of knowledge?”

Living World Rocky Shore
wickED

wickED is a student-facing website developed by the Ministry of Education to support after-school homework centres for primary and intermediate schools.

You can use wickED's activities to support a range of delivery approaches, including inquiry learning and integrated curriculum themes, or for individualised study and skill practice.

This site includes the following English language versions of Māori-themed interactives:

  1. Te wānanga o ngā manu – Learn about the movements of native birds and the use of the traditional taiaha.

  2. Matariki – Find information pertaining to the Matariki constellation.

  3. Hāngī – Make a hāngī and observe the science of the hāngī process.

  4. Wharenui – Use this bilingual interactive to learn about different parts of a wharenui. 

wickED
NZ Science Learning Hub

Entering the keyword “Māori” into this quality-assured New Zealand website presents over 300 results featuring content with a Māori theme. Resources on this site include video, animations, interactives, teaching resources and articles.

NZ Science Learning Hub
Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai

New Zealand on Air and Ngāi Tahu funded this lifestyle series featuring 12 ten-minute episodes filmed in Te Waipounamu. It captures the stories and essence of traditional food-gathering practices passed down through the generations.

The series offers a window into the lives of Ngāi Tahu whānau carrying on the food-gathering traditions of their ancestors – from tūna and pātiki on the east coast, medicinal rongoā plants in the north, to kanakana in the far south. Through its characters, viewers can explore the evolution of the practice – its past, present, and future – and learn about the species and their natural environment.

Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai

Resources and downloads

Network for Learning: Pond

After logging into the Network for Learning’s Pond environment, a search using the keyword “Māori” produces a wide range of results.

Ako Panuku

Ako Panuku provided Māori secondary/kura teachers with professional learning that exemplified best teaching practice, and promoted career development, while creating involvement in a community of practice.
Ako Panuku web presence was developed to support and build on the expertise and professionalism of Māori teachers, and contains many Māori themed resources for English medium schools.

Science Online – Scientific knowledge and Māori knowledge about mussel biology

This level 4–5 Living World resource on the topic of the rocky shore has a particular focus on how traditional knowledge and science knowledge can work together, in the context of the resource management of green-lipped mussels. It asks the question, “What is the same and what is different about these two types of knowledge?”

wickED – Māori-themed interactives in English

wickED is a student-facing website developed by the Ministry of Education to support after-school homework centres for primary and intermediate schools.

New Zealand Science Learning Hub

This quality-assured New Zealand website includes videos, animations, interactives, teaching resources, and articles. Entering the keyword “Māori” into Resources on the site presents over 300 results featuring content with a Māori theme.

Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai

Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai is a lifestyle series funded by New Zealand on Air and Ngāi Tahu. It features 12 ten-minute episodes filmed in Te Waipounamu. These capture the stories and essence of traditional food-gathering practices passed down through the generations.

Ka Hikitia case studies

This series of case studies tells the stories of five schools that have engaged in making a difference for their Māori students. It includes 32 videos, key focus points, and questions. The case studies are intended as a conversation starter for teachers, whānau, boards of trustees, principals and parents.

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Te reo Māori and tikanga reference websites

This gallery features a range of national websites and resources that teachers may find useful as part of their planning.

Contributions and resources

Te Puni Kōkiri

This site describes itself as "committed to providing well-informed and strategic advice to address the needs and aspirations Māori hold: as hapū and iwi partners to the Treaty of Waitangi; as culturally distinct peoples; and as whānau members and citizens."

Source: Te Puni Kōkiri

Te Puni Kōkiri
Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori  The Māori Language Commission

The Māori Language Commission was set up under the Māori Language Act 1987 to promote the use of Māori as a living language and as an ordinary means of communication.

Source: Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori
Te Kāhui Māngai (image)
Iwi area map
Description

Te Kāhui Māngai (Directory of Iwi and Māori Organisations) is part of the Te Puni Kōkiri website. Its  map of New Zealand gives information on iwi identified in the Māori Fisheries Act 2004 and those iwi and hapū that have begun the process of negotiating settlement of their historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. Thie information includes their rohe, hapū, marae, and the organisations whose mandates to represent them have been recognised by the New Zealand Government.

Source: Te Puni Kōkiri

Te Kāhui Māngai
Te Kete Tikanga Māori

This resource has been developed by government agency New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE). 

It’s written for you, your family, friends, and business partners to share New Zealand’s distinctive cultural heritage. It provides a window on Māori history, customs, and culture and goes hand-in-hand with the Arohatia te Reo Māori language booklet. … Māori culture and values help us understand who we are and where we are from. Be proud of our heritage. Put your best foot forward in sharing New Zealand with our customers and partners.

New Zealand Trade and Enterprise – Te Kete Tikanga Māori ;
Te Kete Tikanga Māori

Resources and downloads

Te Puni Kōkiri – The Ministry of Māori Development

Te Puni Kōkiri is a multi-disciplinary agency, which leads Māori public policy and advises on policy affecting Māori. Te Puni Kōkiri works within government and communities to support Māori collective success at home and globally.

Te Taura Whiri i te reo Māori – The Māori Language Commission

The Māori Language Commission was set up under the Māori Language Act 1987 to promote the use of Māori as a living language and as an ordinary means of communication.

Te Kāhui Māngai (Directory of iwi and Māori organisations)

This part of Te Puni Kōkiri’s website shows a map of New Zealand that gives information on iwi identified in the Māori Fisheries Act 2004 and those iwi and hapū that have begun the process of negotiating settlement of their historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. The information includes their rohe, hapū and marae.

NZ Trade & Enterprise – Te Kete Tikanga Māori – Māori Cultural Kit

This resource, developed by government agency New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) is for sharing “New Zealand’s distinctive cultural heritage. It provides a window on Māori history, customs, and culture and goes hand-in-hand with the Arohatia te Reo Māori language booklet.”

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School Journal and Junior Journal stories with Māori themes

Ministry-commissioned School Journals, Junior Journals, and Ready to Read publications continue to be produced. This gallery lists some of the stories that have a Māori theme.

Contributions and resources

School Journals Level 2 (image)
School journal montage
School Journal Level 2 stories with Māori themes

Since 2014, School Journals have been available for viewing online within the Literacy Online area of TKI, supported in some cases by teachers’ notes and audio files. The following slides list some of the journals that include Māori-themed stories.

School Journals Level 2
Māori-themed stories

A list of some of the level 2 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. “Kurī” by Priscilla Wehi
    (SJ L2 October 2015)*

  2. “Best Mates” by Paora Tibble (SJ L2 August 2015)

  3. “Jump!” by Chris Szekely
    (SJ L2 May 2015)

  4. “Poi” by Tira Johnson
    (SJ L2 November 2014)

  5. “Pōhā: A Clever Way of Storing Food” by Michael Stevens (SJ L2 September 2014)*

  6. “Kaitiaki of the Stream” by Pātaka Moore and Monique Logan (SJ L2 October 2013)*

  7. “Iron Tamariki” by Paora Tibble (SJ L2 June 2014)

Māori-themed stories
More Māori-themed stories

More of the level 2 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. “Carving” by Apirana Taylor (SJ L2 August 2013)

  2. “Ask Eddie” by André Ngāpō (SJ L2 April 2013)

  3. “Kūtai Fritters” by Charlene Mataio (SJ L2 August 2012)

  4. “Namu and Waeroa” by Ross Calman (SJ L2 May 2012)

  5. “Kātarina Te Heikōkō Mataira: Walking on the lands of our Tīpuna” by Oho Kaa (SJ L2 February 2012)

  6. “A Grin from Ear to Ear” by Tipene Watson (SJ L2 October 2011)

More Māori-themed stories

Resources and downloads

School Journals – Literacy Online

The School Journal supports students in years 4−8 to develop the knowledge and skills required to meet the reading demands of all the curriculum areas. Since 1907, the School Journal has delivered New Zealand content to motivate, excite, and engage students across the curriculum. Since 2014, the School Journals have been available in digital form as well as print, giving teachers more ways to use these resources with their students. Many of the Journals include stories with Māori themes.

School Journals Level 3 (image)
School journal montage
School Journal Level 3 stories with Māori themes

Since 2014, School Journals have been available for viewing online within the Literacy Online area of TKI, supported in some cases by teachers’ notes and audio files. The following slides list Māori-themed stories that appear in the level 3 School Journals.

School Journals Level 3
Māori-themed stories

A list of some of the level 3 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. The Remarkable Reti” by Kiwa Hammond and Duane Culshaw (SJ L3 October 2015)*

  2. “Spirit of the Bird” by Ben Brown (SJ L3 August 2015)

  3. “Tohunga” by Potiki (Patariki Grace) (SJ L3 November 2014)

  4. “Mahinga Kai Crusaders” by Stanley Walsh (SJ L3 September 2014)

  5. “Te Hokowhitu-a-Tū: The Māori Pioneer Battalion” by Monty Soutar (SJ L3 June 2014)

  6. “Serious Game” by Ross Calman (SJ L3 October 2013)

  7. “Wero” by Andre Ngāpo
    (SJ L3 August 2013)

  8. “Ngā Mahi a te Rēhia – Māori Games” by Ross Calman (SJ L3 April 2013)

Māori-themed stories
More Māori-themed stories

More level 3 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. “Iratumoana and Tarakura of the Rangatikei Plains” by Bernadine Ngaheu ( SJ L3 September 2012)

  2. “Heartbeat” by André Ngāpō (SJ L3 June 2012)

  3. “Tarere Ana Au” by Hirini Melbourne (SJ L3 June 2012)

  4. “In the Beginning” by Kātarina Te Heikōkō Mataira (SJ L3 April 2012)

  5. “Hone Tuwhare” by Ross Calman (accompanying “Rain” by Hone Tuwhare) 
    (SJ L3 February 2012)

  6. School Journal, Part 3, Number 3, 2010 (Rēkohu-themed journal)*

More Māori-themed stories

Resources and downloads

School Journals – Literacy Online

The School Journal supports students in years 4−8 to develop the knowledge and skills required to meet the reading demands of all the curriculum areas. Since 1907, the School Journal has delivered New Zealand content to motivate, excite, and engage students across the curriculum. Since 2014, the School Journals have been available in digital form as well as print, giving teachers more ways to use these resources with their students. Many of the Journals include stories with Māori themes.

School Journals Level 4 (image)
School journal montage
School Journal Level 4 stories with Māori themes

Since 2014, School Journals have been available for viewing online within the Literacy Online area of TKI, supported in some cases by teachers’ notes and audio files. The following slides list Māori-themed stories that appear in the level 4 School Journals.

School Journals Level 4
Māori-themed stories

A list of some of the level 4 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. “The Seeing Hawk” by Ben Brown (SJ L4 October 2015)

  2. “Hakaraia: Warrior Peacemaker” by Mark Derby (SJ L4 May 2015)*

  3. “Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa/The New Zealand Wars” by Ross Calman (SJ L4 November 2014)

  4. “King and Country” by André Ngāpō (SJ L4 June 2014)

  5. “On the Trail of a Taniwha” by Rob Tipa (SJ L4 October 2013)

  6. “King Street Bridge” by Hinemoana Baker (SJ L4 October 2013)

Māori-themed stories
More Māori-themed stories

More level 4 Māori-themed stories that appear in the School Journals.

The titles marked with an asterisk were developed with iwi.

  1. “Te Manako” by André Ngāpō (SJ L4 May 2013)

  2. “Too Much, Nanny P” by Viktor Allen (SJ L4 October 2012)

  3. “Rata and the Totara Tree” by Kātarina Te Heikōkō Mataira (SJ L4 March 2012)

  4. School Journal Part 4, Number 3, 2010 (Rēkohu-themed journal)*

More Māori-themed stories

Resources and downloads

School Journals – Literacy Online

The School Journal supports students in years 4−8 to develop the knowledge and skills required to meet the reading demands of all the curriculum areas. Since 1907, the School Journal has delivered New Zealand content to motivate, excite, and engage students across the curriculum. Since 2014, the School Journals have been available in digital form as well as print, giving teachers more ways to use these resources with their students. Many of the Journals include stories with Māori themes.

Junior Journals (image)
Junior journal montage
Junior Journals with Māori-themed stories

The Junior Journal is an instructional reading series for students who are working at early level 2 in the New Zealand Curriculum and reading Ready to Read texts at Purple and Gold. These journals also contain stories with Māori themes.

Junior Journals
Māori-themed stories

A list of some Māori-themed stories that appear in Junior Journals.

  1. Junior Journal 51

    “Kāhu and Hōkioi” by Ariana Tikao

  2. Junior Journal 50

    “Kākano” by Kelly Joseph

  3. Junior Journal 49

    “Tūī” by Kelly Joseph

  4. Junior Journal 48

    “Rongoā Māori” by André Ngāpō

  5. Junior Journal 47

    “Kahu Ora” by Marama Rangiaho-Katipa

  6. Junior Journal 46

    “Hinemoa and Tūtānekai”

  7. Junior Journal 45

    “Uira” by Hirini Melbourne

Māori-themed stories

Resources and downloads

Junior Journals – Literacy Online

The Junior Journal supports students to make the transition from individual Ready to Read texts to reading the level 2 School Journal. Texts in the Junior Journal have fewer illustrations and denser text layouts to prepare students for reading longer texts. The Junior Journal builds on students’ previous learning, encouraging fluent and independent reading behaviours on longer and more complex texts and providing opportunities to learn across the curriculum. These Journals are a good source for Māori-themed stories.

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This is a Ministry of Education initiative

Building a world-leading education system that equips all New Zealanders with the knowledge, skills, and values to be successful citizens in the 21st century.